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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a Type 99 and have been able to find out a lot of the basic information about it like estimated production time, factory and so on. It came with a monopod, aircraft sights, and a leather sling with a faded cloth patch on it.

I don't know much beyond what I can find based on the serial number and other basic markings. I was talking to someone at a gun show the other day and they said based on the serial number, series number and factory it may not have been issued with a dust cover. I was wondering if anyone knew if that was true or if they could tell me anything else about my rifle.

84947 serial number
Toyo Kogyo Factory
Series 31
1943 production?









The patch is really faded and I can't really make out any distinct markings. I don't know Japanese so even if I could see something I wouldn't know what it said.



I also picket up a good luck flag and bayonet at the gun show. I was told for this series and date the rifle could have been issued with hooked or straight guards. Again I don't know how true this is and would like to know if I ended up getting everything that would be a good representation for what the rifle would be issued with.



Supposedly the bayonet was picket up by a USMC Sgt in Guam, hence the initials carved into the wood. Its marked with the basic Kokura (Tokyo) Arsenal marking and numbered 91806 series 35. The rubberized frog and scabbard has seen better days but the blade looks to have been kept in really good condition.



The good luck flag supposedly says "May your military fortunes be long lasting" and includes two oval hanko seals and is about 1' square.

Any information would be greatly appreciated, I can also post any more pictures of different parts of the gun if need be.
 

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The bayonet scabbard is for a "naval special" bayonet. Which would have been made much later than the rifle. The linen tag on the sling is usually associated with the owner or group. It's a nice find when you get them still attached to the sling.
 

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MrSultan531,

I believe I am the one who spoke to you at the show. I was the one who had the Arisaka display Gettysburg PA. That is a very nice rifle! Now that I can see the series I can say it would indeed have had a dust cover (oops, originally wrote bayonet, ha!). My reference to maybe not having a dust cover was more about how some folks will add parts to rifles that wouldn't have normally had them (5th series Nagoyas with added monopods for example).

Your rifle is in very good shape. I'll be set up at the York show at the end of June, so if you can feel free to stop by with it and I'll take another look. Glad that I was able to get you to share this rifle!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for the information, would you think a hook type bayonet would still be a good representation on an early 1943 type 99 or do you think it would be better suited to get a straight bayonet? I assume it would be in the traditional tube type scabbard I had seen.
 

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Thank you for the information, would you think a hook type bayonet would still be a good representation on an early 1943 type 99 or do you think it would be better suited to get a straight bayonet? I assume it would be in the traditional tube type scabbard I had seen.
No problem! Glad I could help you out. For me personally I'd use a hooked type bayonet with the metal type scabbard. However if the rifle had stuck around with the Japanese military (and not been captured) until the end of the war it could have been issued with anything. That's why I'd stick with a hooked type. Your bayonet scabbard is a very nice late war example, but I'm not a big expert on them so I'll leave that for the other members to comment on.
 

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I think perhaps the flag is a Seabee special. Except 武運長久 the writing seems to be gibberish done by a non Japanese. 武運長久 is written left to right, in those days right to left would have been the norm, the shrine stamps seem odd too. The orientation of the flag writing, tie strings on top, are typical of Seabee examples, as is it's small size. Japanese good luck flags tend toward 35" x 25" +/- generally speaking.

I hate to say all this but we're here to learn first and foremost. I love the other items!

Rod
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you for that, Its good to know what it really is instead of going for years thinking its something it isn't.

Any idea if the unit patch is legible enough to read? I tried to see if the numbering/ wording from a bunch of Japanese units on wikipedia might look familiar. None of what I looked at seemed to resemble what I could see on the patch.
 

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With the barrel pointed towards the ground it looks like 寄 Ki (or "yo", "ru") might be written on the sling tag. I'm not even sure that's the correct orientation but if so it could be part of the soldier's name or the first kanji for "kiyo" = "service". Nothing you can take to the bank, just a thought. It's hard to get anything from the pic.

Tom's take on the flag is right, it is a great WW2 Pacific war collectable.

Rod
 
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