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Discussion Starter #1
It turns out that a friend of mine from work has a Type 99 (mismatched/ground Nagoya Series 6, according to the markings) that his father had brought back from the Pacific at the end of WWII. He recently found out that I was into military rifles, and we got to talking about it.

It's lost its stock along the way (but has the trigger guard, magazine, tangs & screws), and has some light overall surface rust, but is functional and I think it would clean up okay. It has a nice looking chrome-lined bore, and I told him that if we could find a stock set, that he could most likely put it back into shooting shape. He was fairly excited to find out the arsenal/series and other information about it.

After thinking about all of the separate pieces that would be needed (stock, handguard, buttplate, screws, barrel bands, sling swivel, etc.), I told him that the best bet would be to find a donor rifle with a missing bolt or bad bore, but otherwise complete. He knows that being as it is, that it's not worth much to collectors, but since his Dad brought it back, it's near priceless to him, and a mismatched stock set wouldn't be a problem (at least it would look like a rifle, again).

I found a relatively cheap (<$100) Type 99 with a decent looking stock/metal set (mismatched, ground, no extras) that might make a good donor, but it's a Tokyo Juki Kogyo Series 37.

Finally the question: I know it's a long shot, but would anyone know offhand if the Nagoya series 6 action would fit into the Tokyo Juki Kogyo Series 37 stock set without much carpentry, or should I keep looking? Thanks in advance.
 

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Hello JacobCR03 :
Unless it is a very late 37th series without a short cleaning rod attachment, then it will be ok. All 99 stocks basically fit all 99 actions of the same features.
To clarify your friend's 6th series is a transitional action, to restore it correctly it should have a 2 screw front band, round cleaning rod attachment in the forend, non-monopod slotted or solid rear band, stock should have no drain holes, and a normal cupped butt-plate. The wood should be Nagoya proofed.
So if exactitude isn't a problem the 37th rifle should be ok specially if the front barrel band is of the 2 srew variety.
Vicasoto
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Wow, that was fast. Thanks for the information, Vicasoto--It's just what I was hoping to hear, and my friend will be glad to hear it, as well.

I don't have the Series 37 in hand, yet, but from what I've seen, it looks like it has the later features you mention.

Thanks, again, and I'll post here how it works out.
 

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"...mismatched, ground.." Ruin another rifle? The one in question is already ruined for a collector. I agree that a 6th series stock would be best, but he could use the 37th, complete his friend's rifle and if and when a 6th series parts rifle came along he could use it, "reconstruct "the ground, mismatched rifle and "un-ruin" it. Es Verdad?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Arisaka stock

I looked in the obvious places for a complete (and decent looking) stock set (Gunbroker, Auction Arms, and even ebay), but found that the stocks for sale by themselves were very much by themselves--I'd also have to find the buttplate, buttplate screws, sling swivel, sling swivel screws, rear barrel band, front barrel band, front band screws, handguard, and in some cases, the recoil lug, as well.

If I could find all of that for less than the $100 that I'm paying for the series 37, I definitely would go that route. Since the Japanese rifles never were imported in any great numbers, the pickings are a bit slim, and most of the rifles have picked up the surface rust and general closet rot of neglect since they came back from the war.

I'm very much against the parting out of rifles (a la ebay, where the sum of the parts is greater than the whole), but I'm willing to mess up a non-descript, unknown history rifle in order to save a rifle that was brought back by a soldier in WWII whose son now has possession of it and would like to keep it as a rifle and not just a chunk of metal (the father passed on a couple of years ago).

I'll definitely look closely at the Series 37 for the original screws being still staked, matching serial or assembly numbers, matching stock, etc., before making the swap, but from what I've seen it's mismatched, missing the bolt internals, dust cover, cleaning rod, with a ground Mum and the normal closet surface rust.

Thanks for the suggestions and food for thought.
 

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Have him get a reproduction stock. Tokyo Juki a uncommon maker, would be a shame to part it out. Post some pics of the Tokyo juki. There is a parts gun for sale on gunbroker right now, maybe you could buy it and spare the tokyo juki. I see the bolt internals are missing, that probably would make it a good candidate for donorship, but I would be careful.
 

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Support

Jacob,
sometimes a rifle has to be sacrificed for the greater good. I could use a nice TJK 37 stock, but so can your friends dad's bringback 6 series. You plan sounds reasonable to me.

I sacrificed a decent, but ground, mismatched 2nd type T44 to restore my Love of Country (LOC) T44 barreled receiver . I still have the spare pieces and if I ever catch loose stock, I'll but her back.

Meanwhile the LOC has wood and looks great that way.

In this area there are no really good choices, all the parts come from a rifle somewhere.
 

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Maybe you could give your friend the barreled reciever and if you ever run across a 6th series stock, you could get the Juki back together.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Type 99

Josh man,

I haven't heard of reproduction Type 99 stocks, but I'm assuming that it would be fairly pricey, as custom stocks usually are. That would also leave all of the metal bits to find and fit to the stock, as well.

Is the parts rifle you mention the one on Auction Arms with a bad bore? (I'm trying to find out if the seller will honor an 03 license before I bid.) That would be a good candidate, as well.

With the Tokyo Juki, I lowballed a bid on Auction Arms, and ended up getting it:

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=80777996

Since you mentioned the relatively low production numbers of the Tokyo Juki vs. Nagoya or Kokura, I'll definitely think more before I do anything.

03man, thanks for the support. I've found from past experience that I can't actually get just a parts donor rifle--if the barrel and receiver are still together in the gun cabinet or closet, part of my mind will always be on the lookout for parts to complete it. I have quite a few orphans and strays that I've picked up as parts guns, or sporter rescues.
 

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Numrichs has the repro stocks.

http://www.e-gunparts.com/dept.asp#TheAs

They are 125 a piece, your friend will get his arisaka restored, and you will have a 100 dollar tokyo juki that is complete. The repro stocks look good too.

You have a nice tokyo juki too by the way, I think you should keep it intact, because when you talked about it I was expecting a beat to hell rifle, but it is your rifle and you can do whatever you wish with it(I wouldnt switch the stock out though, but if you want to, go nuts.)
 

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Josh is right,
the TJK is a pretty nice looking rifle; I'd leave it alone.

Keep looking for a stock. They do turn up. I wouldn't go with a repro, 4,5,6 series Nagoya stocks are not scarce, just be patient.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If the stock matches (which it looks like it probably will), I think I'll have to leave it alone. I had already promised the stock to my friend, but I'm sure he'd understand--historically speaking.

Just so it doesn't sound like I'm calling off the deal because it might be worth more than I paid, I'll probably fill him in on the relative scarcity in comparison to the other arsenals, the fact that it's too good to part-out, and offer the whole rifle to him for what I paid, just to be fair.

In the meantime, I'll keep looking, and let you know more details on the TJK rifle once I get it.

It's good to know that the repro stocks are out there, but the extras needed would probably put it out of his price range.
 

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Hey JacobCR03:
Here are a few thoughts to help put things in perspective: a) unless you have a ready supply or spare parts on hand you need a complete rifle to make the restoration. b) it is nice to know there are specialty/reproduction stocks, but them there are just wood and they are not "original" either. c) there are a couple of guys on these boards such as 03man and myself who have extensive spare parts and can supply you with the odds & ends needed to complete the project.
Your initial intent was to restore your friend's rifle back to military condition with 99 parts. for 100 or so the job will be complete period. Now if your friend wants a proper or correct restoration that will pass muster then you must start with a correct arsenal rifle of similar series condition, at this time such rifles are in the 150 to 300 range and there are a couple on the sale boards; obviously that will cost more, the 37th series consisted of 56,000 + rifles with early to transitional features, it is a common enough series that taking one appart is not going to cause a major catastrophy to the environment or the collecting world.
If these fellows who feel pity for the poor lil ole 37th are serious they should offer you to rescue it by buying off from you. I agree that it is a shame to destroy or piece out a complete nice mum and matching rifle with all its bells and whistles. On the other hand unless it is a rare 12th or a rope hole, a plain jane ground mismatch bolt but complete rifle is a good sacrifice to restore something important.
We are not talking about dismembering a kid just an old rifle.
Vicasoto
 

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ILL look when I get back home to see if I have a spare 6th series stock with clear proofs.If the TJK bolt stem matches the rest of the gun ,I say stripping it is a mistake, however if its mis-matched then its a good a donor as any.
 

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What state are you in? I may be able to "rescue" the rifle off you. I have a good friend who wants a japanese rifle, and I told him I would keep my eyes open for him.
 

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Josh, I know you have good intentions, but I think you are missing the point. A guy's dad brought this rifle back, and by using the donor rifle, it will be complete again. To this guy, it doesn't matter if it is "restored" correctly, and by putting it together, he will enjoy it and maybe make another heirloom gun collector.

Why is saving a nondescript rifle more important than 'allowing" a WW2 vet bring back to reclaim some of its own glory? Its great to save one rifle, better for 2, but another parts gun will come along, shame is, it'll still be missing this or that, and it sounds like this has everything...

Ed
 

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6 of one half dozen of another i guess. all in all, if he does the stock swap, two rifles will be ruined instead of one. nagoya stocks are super easy to find but TJKs are not. it may make one person happy to have a quick fix, but another collector will be put off by the whole thing. bottom line is, its not our rifle, so i for one cannot pass judgement.
 
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