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Discussion Starter #1
Three different configurations of the disconnector cam on the rear barrel lug were tried before the final simplified design was adopted. (This was evidently done in an attempt to control the thrust of the recoiling lug against the disconnector, which is mounted in the top of the trigger, during recoil.) These early configurations have been observed starting with the original production in Showa 10.6 and running though the late Showa 12- or early 13-dated pistols. In attempt to narrow down when the different configuration changes occurred, I ask that if you own or encounter an early Type-94 dated Showa 10 through 13 that you fill out the form and forward your findings to me. My contact information is on the bottom of the form. To those of you who have already contributed to this little study I want to say thank you.

Form can be down loaded from both the Banzai web site http://www.gunboards.com/sites/banzai/Pistols/Crabtree/CrabtreeStudy.htm#Top_Crabtreeor at
Castle-Thunder.com http://www.castle-thunder.com/datasheets/94bl.pdf .
 

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Dale, by any chance do you have this information on 12.12 S/N 4185? I got it from Rampage & wonder if he might have provided you with this information. I can get it for you if not. It's just such a joy taking these apart! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Rob, thanks for the offer and response and to answer your question, no I don't have yours listed. In fact I don't have any 12.12 dates listed and I could use them as from what little data I have received it appears that in the late 12 date period is when the transition to final style was adopted. Don't you just love the "auto disassembly feature" that the type-94 is known for?
 

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T14,
If you post a 'dissassembly procedure' for the T94, I'm sure the guys would appreciate it and you might get more data submitted!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
03man, that "auto disassembly feature" term stems from when you have the slide of the 94 pulled to rear and remove the crossbolt from the bolt and cocking piece, if you do not have a firm grasp on the slide the force from the pressure releasing of the recoil spring will complete the disassembly process for you and you will spend the next few minutes trying to make you sure have all the parts you just sent sailing across the room. For proper disassembly procedures check out http://members.shaw.ca/nambuworld/jiw17a.jpg
 

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Not the most pleasant pistol to take down, especially if something is being stubborn. I jokingly tell folks to wear safety glasses & hold the pistol inside a box to catch all the flying parts! Another good point to make is not to use a screwdriver or anything hard to push out the crossbolt. Many of these are scratched from this being done. I use a chopstick.
 

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I often wonder if the scratched crossbolts got that way from people trying to drive it out without depressing the firing pin. An examination of the pin will tell if that happened, especially if it is a replaced pin. I am very lucky that on my 19.7 date, once I take the spring pressure off and depress the firing pin, the crossbolt falls right out.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Adogs idea of using a chop stick works well as does any small piece of wood. I've seen a lot of crossbolts damage from someone using punches/screw drivers and such. Another thing that happens is when the un-learned tries to drive it out left-to-right and sears off the small *** on side of the crossbolt, ruins a nice pistol.
 
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