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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ive seen alot of arisakas, but nothing like this...

anyone know what the W signifies? ill guess some property mark other than the military? the rifle matches and is in real nice shape. local shop has it and cant find any info to help pricing it. They have always treated me well so i thought id do some research but im getting nowhere

is this a no series Nagoya? do the two small o‘s before the serial number indicate removed from service use? i saw this as a footnote on a arisaka markings website

thx all, Lear

only grabbed a couple pix...

3827752

3827753
 

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You see that in a smaller version stamped on parts, barrels, and receivers of both 38 and 99 rifles. I have seen it a lot behind the lug of Type 99 receivers. I have never seen it on the receiver ring and do not know what it means.
 

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It's a M not a W. I believe concession is for the military reserve. Also heard it was used before "teach" Mark's where started.

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The M marking has been debated for 30 plus years, but as said above, it is believed to have been a mark applied to rifles removed from normal military service.
Maybe for reservists, maybe for training (school use), maybe for guard use, maybe for rail road protection in China, and maybe for all of these non military uses.
The two zeros applied before the serial number indicates it was reworked after being removed from military service.
 

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This is an example of a late 28th series Type 38 which was never stamped with a mum. Instead they had a neatly stamped school marking/Reservist (your example) in place of the mum. Many rifles in the early 80,000 range of this series are similarly marked, with no evidence of grinding or other modification to receiver.

Your rifle also has the "OO" mark before the series marking which indicated school usage. Reservist marked rilfes were supposed to be stamped with "OOO" before the serial number. Normally a school rifle would be marked with "OO", but evidently many rifles from this serial range have the order reversed, with some reserve rifles being "OO" marked instead.

Here is my example, which is school marked, but "OOO" marked before the series marking.

Very uncommon rifle!
 

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The M marking has been debated for 30 plus years, but as said above, it is believed to have been a mark applied to rifles removed from normal military service.
Maybe for reservists, maybe for training (school use), maybe for guard use, maybe for rail road protection in China, and maybe for all of these non military uses.
The two zeros applied before the serial number indicates it was reworked after being removed from military service.
The OP's rifle was never reworked. It was taken directly from production and put into reservist usage. Never would have even had the chance really to be reworked. This is a known variant in the late 28th series range of Nagoya production.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thx guys, lots to think about. fwiw the guns not mine although imay pick it up. like i said this shop has been good to me i justthought i could help them with some research. ill give them the info and let them set a price. i havepaused c&r buying lately, dunno if this one would get me to pry the wallet open.

lear
 

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thx guys, lots to think about. fwiw the guns not mine although imay pick it up.

lear
Did the bolt and floorplate match? I would 100% go back and buy that if it's priced reasonably. Very rare rifle!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
bolt matched on underside of the handle. extractor unnumbered. i think the floorplate was unnumbered also. bayo lug matched. cleaning rod was screw in type. ill be in touch w the shop owner soon. i can probably ask him to set it back for a couple days till i get back.
 

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This is an example of a late 28th series Type 38 which was never stamped with a mum. Instead they had a neatly stamped school marking/Reservist (your example) in place of the mum. Many rifles in the early 80,000 range of this series are similarly marked, with no evidence of grinding or other modification to receiver.

Your rifle also has the "OO" mark before the series marking which indicated school usage. Reservist marked rilfes were supposed to be stamped with "OOO" before the serial number. Normally a school rifle would be marked with "OO", but evidently many rifles from this serial range have the order reversed, with some reserve rifles being "OO" marked instead.

Here is my example, which is school marked, but "OOO" marked before the series marking.

Very uncommon rifle!
As usual you have the rare and uncommon. And with the trapzoid rear sight. Very nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
hey guys i. going back to see this rifle again. I know it hasnt sold, the guns on consignment and the owner wants 975. i think thats high, but i figured id ask to see if anyone has any opinions. maybe if the gun was stone cold mint, but its not.

also, this gun series should match by serial number correct? no assembly numbers?

if nothing else i grab more pix and post them

tia

lear
 
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