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The stock on that rifle is a recycled Czech VZ24 stock, the Chinese did use VZ24 Mausers.


Is it possible they scrubbed off the old Japanese markings on the metal parts and re-stamped their own ?
That is a typical Type 38 Arisaka style stock. Note: the dip on the right side of the stock by the receiver, lack of the side swivel on the wrist of the stock, lack of a marking disc. It would have probably taken a lot of effort to put an Arisaka action into a Mauser stock, if possible at all.

The rifle is a Chinese Type 41, also known as Type Xinsi or Xinsi Shi. The first 2 characters on the receiver read "Xinsi" which, in the Oriental hexagenary calendar, indicates 1941. As for the possibility of these being recycled Japanese rifles - not sure but it might be.
 

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Wow...$1,900 and no gray blanket was needed. Here's a minty, matching example from my collection and I'd bet I couldn't get anywhere near that price at auction. These variants are discussed on p. 411 of Frank's Type 38 book.

C/
 

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Two bidders went berserk on that one! They are Arisakas, and anything weird that is Japanese related seems to go for a lot. That is why the Mukden Mausers, among all Chinese Mausers, go for so much more (not that they're really Japanese related, but people think they are). It also helped that this gun appeared on an auction site with nation wide coverage. However, I remember one going for 300 and some last time I saw one on one of these auctions.
 

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Two bidders went berserk on that one! They are Arisakas, and anything weird that is Japanese related seems to go for a lot. That is why the Mukden Mausers, among all Chinese Mausers, go for so much more (not that they're really Japanese related, but people think they are). It also helped that this gun appeared on an auction site with nation wide coverage. However, I remember one going for 300 and some last time I saw one on one of these auctions.
ryg, in a somewhat secondary role, the Mukdens are Japanese related. They were issued to Japanese units. One I examined at the Julia auction of the Stern collection was a rebuild during Japanese occupation. The rifle was near mint, as I remember it, and had a small chrysanthemum stamped on the bottom of the buttstock. About a year ago, I talked with the fellow who won it and pointed out the chrysanthemum. He'd not noticed the stamp before and was pleasantly surprised.
 

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ryg, in a somewhat secondary role, the Mukdens are Japanese related. They were issued to Japanese units. One I examined at the Julia auction of the Stern collection was a rebuild during Japanese occupation. The rifle was near mint, as I remember it, and had a small chrysanthemum stamped on the bottom of the buttstock. About a year ago, I talked with the fellow who won it and pointed out the chrysanthemum. He'd not noticed the stamp before and was pleasantly surprised.
I didn't know that the Japanese put a mum on captured weapons they rebuilt. That particular Mukden Mauser has a mum; therefore, that one is Japanese connected. Most aren't. Similarly, weapons from German occupied nations like French, Dutch, etc which went through a rebuild and received a German stamp are German related. Otherwise, they are just French, Dutch, etc weapons even though they were probably used by the Germans or their puppets. Certainly, the Japanese captured huge numbers of Mukden Mausers when they overran Manchuria in 1931, and they were not going to let them just sit. They also captured and used large numbers of Chinese Hanyang Types, Chiang Kai Shek Types, Type 21's, etc, but they are not considered Japanese related. As you may know, the Mukden Mausers were made at the Chinese Three Eastern Provinces arsenal (called Mukden arsenal in the West) from about 1925 to 1931 when the Japanese invasion of Manchuria caused production to stop. The Japanese then re-tooled the factory to make Arisaka Type 38's, as you may know.

Your point about the mum stamp indicating Japanese rebuilds raises an interesting question: are the Lugers with the mum stamped on them legit? Also, I should start checking other Chinese weapons - both imported and domestically built - to see how many other weapons have the mum rebuild stamps making them Japanese related.
 
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