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Shen-Ch'ang Works, 86 Tung Liang Road, Shanghai. Source: Japanese Staff OffIcers, 13th Army, Shanghai.

"The Japanese reported production of 7,000 grenades per month, 3,000 each of bayonets and pikes and a total of 600 flame thrower guns. BAYONETS WERE BEING FORGED FROM OLD AUTOMOBILE SPRINGS." Three thousand bayonets a month add up to a beaucoup of junk automobile springs, were there Yugos in China?

Ordnance Technical Intelligence Report Number 27. Subject" "Japanese Ordnance Activities in China and Manchuria" Prepared by: Robert K Haskell, Colonel, Ordnance Department. September, 1946. Office of the Chief Ordnance Officer, General Headquarters, Armed Forces, Pacific, Tokyo, Japan. Page 39.

I ran across this while searching for T-89 production info. The OTIR is 141 pages long and contains little of interest to the average collector (including me, a lot of chaff for a little wheat.) My copy is a photocopy that Fred was kind enough to send years ago.

However if 10 or more of you are interested I'll repro. it for our price plus postage and $5.00 (for Ruth's labor) About $15. Make the checks out to me, not her!
 

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I recall my Dad (a veteran of Saipan and Okinawa) saying that he thought the Japanese bayonets looked kind of flimsy. When I got into collecting he took a closer look at a couple I had & was impressed with how well made they were.
 

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Shen-Ch'ang Works, 86 Tung Liang Road, Shanghai. Source: Japanese Staff OffIcers, 13th Army, Shanghai.

"The Japanese reported production of 7,000 grenades per month, 3,000 each of bayonets and pikes and a total of 600 flame thrower guns. BAYONETS WERE BEING FORGED FROM OLD AUTOMOBILE SPRINGS." Three thousand bayonets a month add up to a beaucoup of junk automobile springs, were there Yugos in China?

Ordnance Technical Intelligence Report Number 27. Subject" "Japanese Ordnance Activities in China and Manchuria" Prepared by: Robert K Haskell, Colonel, Ordnance Department. September, 1946. Office of the Chief Ordnance Officer, General Headquarters, Armed Forces, Pacific, Tokyo, Japan. Page 39.

I ran across this while searching for T-89 production info. The OTIR is 141 pages long and contains little of interest to the average collector (including me, a lot of chaff for a little wheat.) My copy is a photocopy that Fred was kind enough to send years ago.

However if 10 or more of you are interested I'll repro. it for our price plus postage and $5.00 (for Ruth's labor) About $15. Make the checks out to me, not her!
Eloldhombre, I will take one whether or not you get ten people, let me know how much.

Also this is a leap of faith on my part since you told me a rifle being sold by your good buddy garfieldsdad aka Odie was a good deal. Damn thing fell apart into two pieces when I got it home after I turned a knob , but no worry I finally got it back together and welded it shut also hit the mum while I was at it, nice rifle now.
 

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I have seen T-30 bayonets that were ground or rusted or cut. I have not seen one that was chipped, broken or bent. They seem like pretty good steel to me. I have never tried to bend or break one to see what it would take. If one of you would try a demolition test on one of yours, let me know the results.

I remember years ago hearing veterans refering to the Japanese as "shooting the scrap iron we sold them back at us". Thats probably where they got the car springs-old Dodges, Fords and chevys.

jim
 

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Of course they were! Old leaf springs make great blades.

Who cares what they are made from? Remember the propaganda of the day!

Steel is steel.
 

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I doubt these were the first rate bayonet the majority of us own or have seen. They are probably the crappers that are associated with the NC type 19 rifles and such. Could also be junk that never made it out of china
 

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I remember reading a horror novel - "Christine" by Stephen King, if any of you were wondering which one - where the main character interacts with a PTO-vet, who is currently in the appliance business and is so bored selling Maytags that he will insert his war stories into any conversation to any ear. The vet keeps talking about his experiences on Guadalcanal and the Japanese attacking his position with "Maxwell Tin Swords."

Doubtless, King expropriated that phrase from what he'd heard from actual vets. Amazing how the Allies sold such ridiculous ideas about the supposed 'inferiority' of the enemy's equipment to their troops. Suppose that's SOP in most wars - belittle the enemy and his weapons to bolster your own morale. There's always people who know better though. Anyone on the receiving end of a Shin-Guntou or Arisaka soon found out the enemy's kit was nothing to be sniffed at.

Best,
Gunnar
 
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