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I don't have the time at the moment to puzzle out some words that are still unclear to me but can give an idea about the two letters.

The long letter is written at Grunbach (there are several places with that name) by a woman which name is Elfriede Heubach. It is an answer to a letter she must have received from a mother from which the son is at the Eastern front. The name of this mother is rather unclear because I read it as "Lore", which is rather a first name to me.
If you should have the envelope ...? Names are usualy of a better penmanship on envelopes.
The mother is worried about her son and asks lady Heubach if her husband could inform himself about him. The problem is that the husband didn't go further as Odessa after a leave at home. Meaning that the son must be further to the East??? But she will ask if he will make an inquiry about the fate of the son. If both women knew each other very well stays unclear but the writer mentions (in the "PS") that she has a fond memory of the son at the moment of her marriage.

The letter in the second picture is written "im Westen", the western front, on the 13th of June 1940. I suppose it was to his girlfriend (most lovable little one) and probably not his daughter. He speaks about making a trip together on a steamboat or attending a boat party. The time between the letters sending and receiving is four days. He is in France (place is not mentioned) and describes the psychological impact on the prisoners of war (black and white soldiers) by the Stukas, bombers and artillery. He got his "Runen Abzeichen", a badge with rune(s) on it. He doesn't specify which rune(s), I know there were different ones but am not a specialist in what it could have been. He hopes that the French will capitulate soon but "they are so mean not to make this fast". The letter isn't complete, I hope there is a reverse or second page in your possession because I find it an interesting letter of the first weeks of WWII.

That's it in a nutshell ... I have no secretary and ... so much to do ... I can make a transcription but it will not be in the first couple of weeks and you'll have to remind me for this.
 

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Amazing! I'll try to scan the rest of it as soon as I get the chance... Thank you so much
 

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I speak German and can translate typed documents.... but for the life of me i just cannot read that damn handwriting. I should work on that. Interesting date on that letter though... June 5th 1944....
 

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I speak German and can translate typed documents.... but for the life of me i just cannot read that damn handwriting. I should work on that. Interesting date on that letter though... June 5th 1944....
I can read these letters and postcards in Frakturschrift/Sutterlin (and do understand them fully if the penmanship allows it), as promised I will make the transcription for Lancer but must ask him to search for somebody to translate them. Not that I am unable to do so but it would take some time I don't have. I'm sure he understands and can rely on other members for this. Lancer, scan the first page of the 1940 letter again please, the last line is unreadable because the paper isn't flat enough under the scanner. I'll keep an eye on this thread, you may always contact me by PM.
 

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Thanks to the translators...really interesting. My daughter is in 4th year German, and all she does is translate, but I am sure it is from typed stuff. I cannot even make letters out, and I thought my handwriting was bad! Anyway, looking forward to the whole deal, and thanks again.
 

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Just FYI the handwriting isn't really "bad" - that first letter is actually quite well written in fact. It's just written in an old German script called Sütterlin. It was the accepted way to write personal correspondence and take notes since the 17th century or so. It's kind of analogous to English shorthand writing. It was mostly taught in secondary schools, so you tend to find better educated Germans writing in it, while those with less education tended to write in a simplified version, or a print script.

The Nazis officially got rid of it in 1941 due to problems with occupied and allied peoples being able to read it, but it continued on for decades afterwards due to the number of people who were familiar with it. Even today you can still find the odd old person who still makes grocery lists with it, although this is quickly becoming very rare.
 

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I can read these letters and postcards in Frakturschrift/Sutterlin (and do understand them fully if the penmanship allows it), as promised I will make the transcription for Lancer but must ask him to search for somebody to translate them. Not that I am unable to do so but it would take some time I don't have. I'm sure he understands and can rely on other members for this. Lancer, scan the first page of the 1940 letter again please, the last line is unreadable because the paper isn't flat enough under the scanner. I'll keep an eye on this thread, you may always contact me by PM.
if you can type it out for me id be happy to translate
 

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Couldn't restrain myself ! Here is the transcription of the long letter. The name of the lady who asked the favor to find out about the whereabouts of her son is "Born", and because ladies used the name of their husband in those days, the son must in all probality be a "Born" too.

Grunbach, 5/6/1944.
Sehr geehrte gnädige Frau !
Nur zugut kann ich Ihren grossen Schmerz verstehen, der Sie veranlasste mir einige Zeilen zu schreiben. Das gleiche tragen wir im Herzen um den Gatten meiner Schwägerin.
Leider kann ich Ihnen gar nichts für Sie so sehr Richtiges mitteilen, denn mein Gatte kam nach seinem Urlaub nur noch bis Odessa. Wurde mit einer Urlauberkompanie in Rumänien eingesetzt und zog sich schon am 27/3 eine Kohlenoxidgasvergiftung zu. Anlässlich dieser ging der Reg(iment???) meines Gatten ins Res(erve) Laz(arett) an der Ostsee u(nd) dann nach Garmisch(?) zum Ers(atz) Bat(a)l(ion) 98, wo er sich Heute noch befindet. Der Hauptm(an) Ihres Sohnes, sowie der Stellvertreter meines Mannes wurden auch schon im März verwundet u(nd) befinden sich im Reich.
Sehr geehrte Frau Born, ich lasse nun mit gleichen Post Ihren Brief an meinen Gatten weggehen. Er wird bestimmt die Kameraden Ihres lieben Sohnes kennen und hoffe dass er Ihnen auch einige Adressen nennen kann.
Ich selbst schrieb schon einigen Frauen der Kameraden meines Gatten. Denn mein Gatte denkt Tag und Nacht an das Wohlergehen seiner Kompanie, auf dir er so stolz ist. Sollte auch ich irgend etwas erfahren was Sie von Wert ist, so werde ich Ihnen recht gerne Mitteilung geben.
Sehr schwer ists, einer so im Ungewissen sehen zu müssen und ich weiss, überall sucht man Rat.
So sehr viele junge Menschen müssen in diesen harten Kämpfen ihr teures Leben lassen. Doch die Hoffnung dürfen wir so schnell nicht aufgeben. Recht gerne wird mein Gatte Ihren Wunsch erfüllen soweit es ihm möglich ist. Auch her versteht durch den Heldentod seiner beiden Brüder sehr gut den Schmerz der bangenden Eltern.
Mit den Wünschen, dass Sie recht bald gute Nachricht von Ihrem lieben guten Sohn erreicht, grüsse ich Sie Herzlichst
Ihre
Elfriede Heubach.

N.S. (Nachschrift = Post Scriptum)
Ihnen, sehr geehrte Frau Born, an dieser Stelle noch recht herzlichen Dank für die Liebe u(nd) Bemühungen, die uns Ihr lieber Sohn zu unserem Hochzeitstage zuteil werden lassen wollte.
 

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had a little trouble as in some parts it doesnt seem to make sense, so i had to improvise a little, but here it goes:

Grunbach, 5 June 1944
Dear Madam,
Only too well can I understand your great pain, which prompted me to write a few lines to you. We carry the same pain in our hearts for the Spouse of my sister-in-law. Unfortunately I can't inform you of with complete accuracy, as my husband only went to Odessa after his vacation. He was placed with a company on leave in Romania and on the 27th of March was poisened by carbon dioxide. Because of this he was sent to a hospital on the baltic sea (sentence is not totally legible), to the 98th reserve company, which is where he still is. Your sons captain (my husbands replacement) was also wounded and is now back in Germany.

Dear Mrs. Born-
Im sending with the same post your letter to my husband. It will certainly reach the friends of your son and hopefully it will get a few adresses for you. I personally wrote a few of the wives of my husbands comrades. My husband thinks day and night about the welfare of his companie, of which he is very proud. If I should run across anything that is of value to you I will gladly inform you.
It is very hard to see someone in such suspense, and everywhere one searches for council.
So many young men have to give their dear lives in this hard fighting, but we cant give up hope so easily. My husband will happily do his best to fulfill your wish. Also here because of the heroic deaths of your two brothers is the pain of the parents.
With wishes, that good news about your beloved son reaches you soon, and with best regards
Elfriede Heubach
 
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