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Other issues affecting accuracy

This is really good advice in so far as it goes! One must also consider that the Russian capture mausers were in reasonably good condition when they were taken apart to be refinished and then reassembled into "Heinz 57 kinds" frankenmausers. A lot of mausers out there in the hands of collectors are no even that good! Some mausers were just about used to death by the governments that owned them. Others were done in by whoever wherever! To help the nimrods out there better understand the real condition of prized mauser (or any other gun), here are some rules of thumb:

1. Look at the muzzle. It should display proper symmetry, with a smooth finish all around. If it does not, there is a problem to the degree that things are out of spec.
2. Look at the bore. It should be bright, shiny and well defined. A dull, dark, pitted or rusty bore with badly defined rifling will not be accurate. It very well may be so bad that it cannot be scrubbed enough get rid of the key holes, or even hit the target!
3. Gauge the bore at the muzzle. This is not at all difficult. Just get a UNFIRED bullet of the right caliber. I am referring to the projectile, not the entire cartridge. Put it pointy end first into the muzzle. There should be about a 5 millimeter (or near a quarter of an inch) space between where the bullet stops at the muzzle and the groove around the middle of the bullet. Every millimeter less than that indicates a loss of accuracy.
4. Look at the bottom number on the rear sight. It most often will be a number between 1 to 4. This number indicates the range, most often, in 100 meter increments, that the rifle should be zeroed to. Early rifles, such as the gew98, were zeroed to 400 meter and should hit dead on at that distance. On shorter distances, the rifle will shoot high in accordance with the actual range. With such a rifle, hold low under 6 o'clock until practice puts you on target. The ww2 98k is sighted for 100 meters and should hit dead on at that range. If it does not, there is a reason for it.
5. Look at the rear sight. It should be within original specifications. Many are not. These rifles, many now 100 years old, were originally put into the hands of troops that actually knew little about how they worked or how to properly maintain them. Every army had more or less, well trained armorers, to keep their rifles in spec. Today's collectors or casual owners, know little to nothing about the real details of how their firearms should work and why. Very many of the GIs who were lucky enough to return home with their war prizes, did not see them as historic treasures, many were chopped up and turned into hunting rifles, with results from godawful to beautiful. Most were simply utilitarian, with the original stock cut back and maybe a scope sight added. Just about all of them had the front sight cover lost or thrown away, at some point. The loss of the front sight cover, exposed the tiny front sight to wear it was never designed to endure. A bit less than 1 millimeter of wear on the front sight, will result in a upward movement of 1 inch in bullet impact. This means that if your rifle is shooting too high, replace the front sight with a taller one. You will need a front sight tool to do this. If are handy with tools, the job can be done with a small hammer and a drift punch. Otherwise find a gunsmith to do the job for you. Some of these have been returned to military appearance. So be weary. Look at ALL prospective purchases carefully.
6. Headspace! Check the serial numbers on bolt, receiver and barrel to see if they match. If they do, that is good, and the rifle appears to be in excellent condition. That is Very Good! On the other hand, if they do not match and the rifle appears to be worn or worse--RED FLAGS! DO NOT SHOOT IT! Get a NO GO headspace gauge in the proper caliber and know how to use it!!
 

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How to correct vertical stringing?
That is a real problem that mostly has more to do with the person behind the gun, than the gun. I have that problem myself. It developed when I was in my 50s and I could no longer see both front and rear sight sharply defined, AND THE TARGET, at the same time. I tried various fixes, but nothing really worked. Today, I am satisfied with a vertical string 2 or 3 inches long, in the bull's eye and just above it.
There are some gun related problems that can have this result, like muzzle damage or a loose rear sight. I would have a friend, who is a good shot, try the rifle and see how it groups for him.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #66
Does anyone have any pics of this? They are no longer showing in the thread.
Someone just sent me a message that they had saved the pictures. I don't think I have them anymore so they will post them to this thread.
 

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