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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Dear Fellow Members-Although I have a VERY shallow curing crack on the top of the wrist behind the rear action screw,I was told that this could migrate.With that in mind,I tried to find pure brass screws,to no avail.Is it possible to use an 8/32" machine thread brass rod and insert 3/4 of the way into the stock with Devcon Epoxy coating after drilling a 9/64" hole?Saw this on an online stock repair article and did not want to spend $30.00 on the Brownell's Stock Pin repair kit,as much as I like it.MUST a person use a wood screw thread or will a machine screw thread work with epoxy?Thanx for any detailed answers:)-Gearhead
 

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Not to answer your question but one time I had a bunch of loose Swedish m/96 stocks I bought from Century Arms. One had a crack just like yours behind the upper receiver tang. Was about 3/8" long maybe 1/2". Since the stock was ratty anyway I used the tablesaw and cut the stock through the rear guard screw. Within a week or two (don't remember exactly) that crack opened up to the underside of the stock. It wasn't visible when it was fresh cut. That was a good example of a ~latent~ crack.

From my 1968-69 photography schooling the word latent means: exposed but not yet developed. Far as a stock crack goes it means it was a done deal from the getgo.

How many times have we seen somebody state that the rifle they want to sell has such a crack but that its "stablized"? What does that mean? I think it means they're trying to tell you its done cracking or it won't crack anymore. I've often wondered how they knew that without doing a Vulcan mindmeld into the cell structure of the wood and journeyed to the *End of the Crack* and came back to report the crack had somehow stopped doing what comes naturally to cracks. I've never believed that.

Dutchman
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanx for the response!

I was told that anything is possible,and that it's prudent to properly repair the wrist with the proper rod.Think that I am going to Accraglass the forward action screw area.Does anybody else have any specific suggestions?-Gearhead
 

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I would think that the thread would be too fine on machine screws for them to get a good bite into the wood. IMO I think the coarse thread of the wood screw would be better. To be honest, I'd spring for the Brownell's repair kit and do it right the first time instead of taking a chance on messing it up.
 

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Alternative Method

It would be best to repair it with a dowel. Drill through across the crack. Use the right sized dowel, around 1/2", and use a saw blade to scrape lines along the length of the dowel before you insert it into the hole. This is for air to escape when you put it in with glue.

Don't clamp the crack closed. The dowel will prevent the crack from becoming larger, but if you put the wood under tension by clamping the crack closed, it will open up, especially if you shoot the gun. Good ol' TiteBond III will work just fine. No need for epoxies.

Leave the dowel a tad long on each side, then cut them off with a very sharp saw, preferably with no kerf. A piece of paper behind it will prevent damage to the stock. If you use a dowel made of the same kind of wood, i.e. walnut, it will be easier to blend in with the original stock.

I'd avoid screws, though it is a Turk. I have a Turk whose front band is held on with a bent nail. Screws would somehow be in character.

CDFingers
 

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Pure brass screws can be a pain in the butt to find at your local hardware outlets. In the pass I've had to order them from black powder firearms building outlets, any mail order business like Track of the Wolf, or Dixie Gun Works should carry them, problem is you have to pay shipping and wait for them to arrive. Personally I'd use the wooden dowel, some good hardware stores and any exotic lumber outlet should have dowels in different woods such as walnut that might help you match the stocks original wood better.
 

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I was able to find brass wood screws at my local ACE Hardware store. I was hoping for ones just a little longer, but I went with what they had. It has been fired numerous times since the repair, and is still holding fine. No propegation or widening of the crack.
Incidently enough, it was my bother's M38 Turkish Mauser stock that I repaired.
 

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Brass all thread rod, steel all thread rod and hardwood dowels are all usable for repairs to cracks.

To install all thread rod into a pre-drilled hole of the appropriate diameter use two nuts on the rod that are tightened against each other. This will work as a "bolt head" to put a wrench on to screw the rod in to the stock. Threaded rodl may also need to be "lubricated" with soap befor screwing it in. Threaded rod can be cut close to the stock after insertion and then dressed with a file to bring it down flush to the wood.

Unlike CDFingers I prefer to glue the crack first with pressure applied to close it. A cabinet maker and milsurp collector I am aquainted with, via the internet, recomends the super glues for gluing wood. For cracks that are "hair line" a thin super glue can be "wicked" into the crack via cappilary action pror to clamping. Thicker super glues and gap filling super gles are also available for those cracks that can be spread open or won't clamp fully closed. These super glues will forma bond stronger than the wood and will work on oily wood also though it is best to degrease and remove as much petrolium as possible.

Vlad
 

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Super glue works great for tight cracks; it does wick in. Depending on the location I then drill slightly undersize holes for cut off steel brads, and superglue the holes before pushing the brads in. Has kept a wrist crack and aft of tang crack tight for a couple years now, with a few hundred rounds, in my '03.
 
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