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Aviator's Rifle 1917
Selfloading Rifle Mondragon
Constructor: General Mondragon (Mexico)
Manufacturer: Swiss Industry Corporation, Neuhausen
Caliber: 7.5 GP11
Function: Gas piston loader, semi-automatic
Lock (Bolt): Rotating bolt
Cartridge Feed: Stick magazine with 12 rounds
Weight: 4.5 Kg
Production: 40 of these rifles were taken and
given to the Aviation Troops in Dubendorf in 1917
 

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I remember reading (but I don't remember which one) in a Swiss publication that there were experimantal versions with an aditional lever. One was to switch between semi-automatic or straight-pull action. The second one was to re-cock the firing pin without ejecting the round.
 

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I remember reading (but I don't remember which one) in a Swiss publication that there were experimantal versions with an aditional lever. One was to switch between semi-automatic or straight-pull action. The second one was to re-cock the firing pin without ejecting the round.
The recocking function makes sense. There is a latch on the operating handle that disengages it, and the bolt, from the gas-driven operating rod, so the action can be worked without resistance from the operating spring. For manual operation, there is a gas shut off in front of the gas piston housing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I remember reading (but I don't remember which one) in a Swiss publication that there were experimantal versions with an aditional lever. One was to switch between semi-automatic or straight-pull action. The second one was to re-cock the firing pin without ejecting the round.


The rectangular shaped piece on the charging handle is the manual disconnect.
 

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That's the patent for the original Model 1900. I think the picture I posted is a Swiss modification to the Model 1908, redesignated as a Swiss Model 1917. There is a rumor there was a full auto version but no proof, I was hoping this was it.
The basic design in the patent drawing probably remained the same. A full automatic version would need a mechanism that holds the sear back until the bolt fully closes, then trips the sear as long as the trigger is depressed. The mysterious lever is located in the right place to accomplish that. Or merely recock the hammer.

My interest in the Mondragon is due to the design features in the Garand, which seem to be an amalgam of the Mondragon and French RSC 17. The Garand's trigger group, specifically the hammer, looks a lot like the RSC 17's, which may be nothing more than a refinement of the Mondragon's. The Garand's rotating bolt and the cam action to operate it to seem to be inspired by the Mondragon. But Garand was no plagiarist, and refined the Mondragon's underslung gas operating system with a simpler design that incorporates the cam in the operating rod. In the Garand, parts have double function; the bolt is also the receiver and magazine cover, and the operating spring also works the en-bloc magazine's follower.
 

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What is the "cam" in the Garand operating rod?

I've attached the trigger groups for both guns for a comparison.
The Garand's operating cam is inside the "hump" of the operating rod. As the operating rod begins to move to the rear, the angled slot bears against the bolt lug and pushes it upwards. This is primary extraction as well as unlocking. Garand shooters typically pack the cam slot with grease. The M14/M1A has a roller at the end of the lug to reduce friction.

Note how the Garand's hammer has two opposing projections that are held by the sear. They are designed to reset the trigger for semi-auto fire only. This is identical to the hammer of the RSC 17. The Mondragon's sear engages a slot in the hammer's push rod.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
But Garand was no plagiarist, and refined the Mondragon's underslung gas operating system with a simpler design that incorporates the cam in the operating rod. In the Garand, parts have double function; the bolt is also the receiver and magazine cover, and the operating spring also works the en-bloc magazine's follower.
Hi Leon, I would not claim that Garand was a plagiarist but how do you explain the following pictures. The Model 1900 uses a double stack eb bloc clip for the 5.2 x 68 cartridge. With the exception of a couple of bumps the Garand clip fits the Mondragon perfectly. I'm looking around for an earlier Garand clip that might be a couple of thousandths of an inch smaller. I figure different makers might had a tolerance to work with. If you can get me the picture of the Garand cam I can show you the cam that was original to the1900 Mondragon. The 1908 has a more complex version.

 

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Hi Leon, I would not claim that Garand was a plagiarist but how do you explain the following pictures. The Model 1900 uses a double stack eb bloc clip for the 5.2 x 68 cartridge. With the exception of a couple of bumps the Garand clip fits the Mondragon perfectly. I'm looking around for an earlier Garand clip that might be a couple of thousandths of an inch smaller. I figure different makers might had a tolerance to work with. If you can get me the picture of the Garand cam I can show you the cam that was original to the1900 Mondragon. The 1908 has a more complex version.
https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjQ8fPFwsrRAhVB7CYKHSeZALEQjRwIBw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.garandgear.com%2Fm1-garand-inspection&psig=AFQjCNFAnwmzDj8mVp_nNz-4o3JhbuYQEQ&ust=1484788555294207


Scroll down for pics of the oprod. The enbloc double row clip may well be Mondragon's refinement of the Mannlicher. Pedersen used a 10-rd enbloc clip for his .276 toggle-action rifle.
 
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