Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I traded a Iver Johnson I had for this Mauser 1914, and could not be happier. This little pistol is numbers matching and near mint (bluing is 90-95% IMO). However before yesterday I knew nothing of these pistols, and I'm looking for info. For example is there a way to tell its exact year?? What's the value of one in this shape?

Lastly i have a question on the firing pin. I was told it needed a new one, and when I took the pistol down I see the ion is in good shape other then the tab/guide that slides in its rail is broken off and gone. Will the pistol still fire with out this or do I need a new pin??

thank you in advance for any help you can give
.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
12,058 Posts

·
Silver Bullet member
Joined
·
34,765 Posts
Hi there new guy!

There are a lot more references to Mauser 1914s and production dates on the "other" gunboards (Jan C. Still's Luger forum, available on luger.gunboards.com -- requires a separate registration BTW). Based on what Google returned to me and that I found there, yours would date to approximately 1921, 1922 at the latest.

Comparing the photos of yours with other 1914s, the trigger has a more purple/blue look to it, indicating a different bluing process than the rest of the pistol (I want to say charcoal or even hot salt). But with yours, it looks like the trigger is the same as the rest of the gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,537 Posts
Lastly i have a question on the firing pin. I was told it needed a new one, and when I took the pistol down I see the ion is in good shape other then the tab/guide that slides in its rail is broken off and gone. Will the pistol still fire with out this or do I need a new pin??
Have you tried the wooden dowel test to see if you need a new firing pin?

Get a wooden dowel and make sure the diameter of the dowel in smaller than the inside diameter of the barrel and the dowel will slide freely in the barrel. Sometimes a pencil will work. Cock the pistol and hold the barrel vertically. Place the dowel in the barrel so that is end is against the face of the slide. Fire the pistol. If the dowel jumps out of the barrel, there is nothing wrong with the firing pin. If the rod doesn't move, then there is a problem with the firing pin. The fastest and easy test I know of the check on the firing pin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,086 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,235 Posts
Doesn't look reblued to me, the lettering looks pretty sharp. As Fushigi said, probably the bluing batch and the eye of whoever did it. It is a 7,65mm aka 32ACP. Gun Parts Corp lists firing pins, they are basically a drop in part, may need a tiny amount of fitting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
I suspect the "tab guide" you refer to may be the part of the firing pin/striker that is engaged by the sear - if so, it won't cock - therefore wont fire (or pass the dowel test).
As I recall, you get a clicking sound when you pull the trigger on an uncocked pistol of this type, which may fool you into thinking the mechanism is "firing".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,763 Posts
Look at the pitting and grain of the metal under the blue on the sideplate and other areas.
Sharp lettering just means that it was not overly polished in this area prior to re-bluing.
The serial number at the rear of the pistol is definitely washed out from polishing.
Definite reblue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,197 Posts
Better picture would give a better indication if the Mauser was reblued. A lot of "speculation" until that happens. This 1914 has seen a lot of use but still a nice example of a well made German pistol. Value, 250/ 275 Imperial marked (Imperial mark in front of rare sight) and in excellent condition 425 450. I own twelve 1914s and 1910 Mauser pistols. (A quality made early made German pistol.)
Joe
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top