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Hello everyone.... I know it's a load question again ... but I'm a tok junkie ... in general are they a good action strength wise ?.. I have everything from Russian to chinese ... and all in between... I've never heard of one grenading on surplus or new ammo ...but then again I dont get out much ...all my toks are in good working order and very well pampered... I would think the combloc would want a sturdy pistol ...
 

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I just used my C&R to pick up a Chinese Type 54 Tokarev from Rguns and the first thing I did was tear it down to clean and inspect. My thoughts are that it is a very solid gun and after shooting it last week I am very impressed with the design and strength.
 

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Hello everyone.... I know it's a load question again ... but I'm a tok junkie ... in general are they a good action strength wise ?.. I have everything from Russian to chinese ... and all in between... I've never heard of one grenading on surplus or new ammo ...but then again I dont get out much ...all my toks are in good working order and very well pampered... I would think the combloc would want a sturdy pistol ...
Yes, the Soviets wanted a sturdy pistol, that's why they were looking into replacing TT as early as '38-'39, but certain events got in the way. As soon as dust settled, they did just that. Hence Pistolet Makarova.
 

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Several pistols in 7.62x25 that were considered as a replacement. Voevodin comes to mind, but based on the experience gained during GPW, TT and 7.62x25 cartridge itself was abandoned soon thereafter. So, to answer OP's question: Tulsky Tokarev is not a robust pistol and was considered a mediocre handgun by the Soviet Army. Just like Tovarisch Mike said, better than a CZ-52, but with a few flaws of its own. On the other hand, I consider Sudaev's '43 to be one of, if not the best sub gun of the time period, that's where 7.62x25 really shines.
 

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Several pistols in 7.62x25 that were considered as a replacement. Voevodin comes to mind, but based on the experience gained during GPW, TT and 7.62x25 cartridge itself was abandoned soon thereafter. So, to answer OP's question: Tulsky Tokarev is not a robust pistol and was considered a mediocre handgun by the Soviet Army. Just like Tovarisch Mike said, better than a CZ-52, but with a few flaws of its own. On the other hand, I consider Sudaev's '43 to be one of, if not the best sub gun of the time period, that's where 7.62x25 really shines.
I don't think that you can say that the Tokarev was "not a robust pistol" and I would like to see your source where the Soviets stated thought it was. It's a Browning tilting barrel clone (locking action) just like a 1911, Hi-Power, and dozens of other designs that are still used today. For the time it was adopted and probably for 20 years after it was solidly average or above average and I've never actually heard of a Tokarev breaking myself. It's definitely a more robust design than the Makarov since that is just a blow-back action.
 

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Well, 7.62x25 is a little different from a .45acp in the operating pressure department and BHP is not known to be the most robust pistol in 9x19 either. Tokarev is just too delicate for the chambering. I personally had cracked slide on two of them, cracked feed lip guide on one as well as a broken sear. That's just a few that I remember. I agree, the design was sound enough, just not for the cartridge it was chambered in. If the pistol was good enough, the Russians would not be looking for a replacement only a few years after they adopted it.
 

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Both cracked slides were on the Russian no added safety ones. One pre-war, the other one post-war. I never kept the war-time ones long enough, used them for resale. Cracked feed lip was on a mint Polish-made one. The ammo I used was mostly Romanian surplus, I had literally thousands of rounds stashed when it was dirt cheap. I don't know about New Russia, but in the Soviet Union, Tokarev was never a highly regarded pistol unlike here for some weird reason.
 

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Both cracked slides were on the Russian no added safety ones. One pre-war, the other one post-war. I never kept the war-time ones long enough, used them for resale. Cracked feed lip was on a mint Polish-made one. The ammo I used was mostly Romanian surplus, I had literally thousands of rounds stashed when it was dirt cheap. I don't know about New Russia, but in the Soviet Union, Tokarev was never a highly regarded pistol unlike here for some weird reason.
i like it because it is slim and not much to catch on clothing. The russians or I should say tokarev must have been inspired by by the browning 9mm long FN 1903.

Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


vs T33 below. The main wrong with the T33 is no external safety. If there was a problem with the slide, I am sure it was fixable by design change or heat treatment. A cracked feed lip on a new gun suggests a manufacturing QC problem.
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You are correct, 1903 FN and 1911 Colt with a few original ideas from Fedor himself. I too like the way TT looks and carries. I used one for a long time as a carry pistol until one day when I actually had to use it in a less than pleasant situation it failed me by a design flaw.
I think in terms of reliability, PM is better than TT.
 

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Not as reliable as PM, especially with hollow points. pcke2000 is 100% correct.
I have only fired and been around a total of three t33s. The t33s always worked with fmj. I have never tried hp ammo. I would think a bottle neck round would feed better than a short fatter straight wall design would like the 9x18 mak vs 7.62x25.
 

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Long ago I was deep into the Russian weapons, had time, money and place to try 'em out. Can't exactly recall how many Tokarevs I've had, but more than a few, that's for sure. In my experience, TeTe does not always respond well to the hollow point ammo. I used a Hornady XTP bullet that ran perfectly in many C96 Mausers and .30 Lugers I used to have. Some Toks did just fine though. On the other hand I don't remember a single problem with pistolet Makarova as far as any ammo goes. Had one go full auto on me once due to the stuck FP, but that's about it. Slide stop is the only weak spot, but not really critical. Excellent handgun in my opinion. The Russians have been using it for over 70 years without complaining much, think about that.
 

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I have two Yugo M-57s which are technically the same design with a longer grip and one more round in the mag. Neither have the added safety and are sporting original Yugo triggers so, no safety at all.
They have eaten everything I have fed them with no issues. Hollow points feed just as well as any FMJs. My shooter usually gets a diet of 110 grain FMJ hand loads.
The quality control in them is very good. Both have tight fitting slides that glide smoothly when racking. All surfaces seem to be well finished which makes for a great shooting pistol. Trigger pull is also very good after a little work. Simply polishing the hammer and sear contact surfaces, and the channels that guide the trigger loop turned a gritty feel into buttery smooth. I disabled the mag safeties by wedging a small piece of tie wrap between it and the frame. This is totally reversible simply by removing the wedge.
It is one of my favorite shooters.
After seeing the type 54s that some are getting, I am even more pleased with these M-57s. The difference in the finish is substantial. Still haven't convinced myself that I need to add a 54 to my collection. After getting spoiled with the longer grip, not sure any TT-33 will come close to satisfying me going forward.
My budget is limited so most of my toys are shooters, and not highly collectable.
 

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The Chinese manufactured guns can be hit or miss. That was back when they could not heat treat and could barely control their steel quality. I had a bring back I picked up in an LA pawn shop. The town was full of them, but no ammo back in the Soviet embargo days. A lot of the gun shops had no idea what ammunition they used. My neighbor was an LA cop and he took me down to Martin Retting in Culver City. They had captured ammo they bought at Government auctions (They claimed). I and two others were shooting cans at an old quarry and I had it along. We fired it so much we could not pick it up because it was so hot. I have had nothing but good experiences with them.
 
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