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Hmm, just noticing the lack of mention on some news stations as well as here.

Wow, 67 years already. Makes one think how our kids, grandkids and great grandkids will be thinking about 11 September 2001 in 60 more years.
Have to keep it alive just as we have to keep alive the second sneak attack on September 11. Never forget...12/7/41, 9/11/01.
 

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Fortunately, the attack on Pearl Harbor still gets a good amount of media attention in Oklahoma for a couple of reasons:

a) We're the kind of state where not a single county went over to Premier Obama.

b) The USS Oklahoma capsizing and turning over is such a dramatic story.

The ship's bell and anchor are on display in Oklahoma City, by the way.

I lived in military housing off-base Pearl Harbor as a child in the late 1960's, so have always had a soft spot in my heart for that part of history.
 

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Knew a guy who regulared the local drinking establishment. He was in the Corps during Korea. Told me when he was at Pearl('51), the buildings were still painted black the way they were shortly after the attack. He passed away about a year ago, but I loved hearing his stories.

Eric, thanks for the bit about Oklahoma. I'm sure there is more mystique about Pearl Harber down there, considering the fate of the USS Oklahoma. Theres a small part of me that thinks an implement of war, such as a battleship, deserves an ending befitting it's role. Instead of rusting away in a shipyard like my state's battleship. I'm sure the men onboard might feel differently though.

We should always remember today.

I'm sure it won't take long for the trolls to ruin this thread though:)
 

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Knew a guy who regulared the local drinking establishment. He was in the Corps during Korea. Told me when he was at Pearl('51), the buildings were still painted black the way they were shortly after the attack. He passed away about a year ago, but I loved hearing his stories.

Eric, thanks for the bit about Oklahoma. I'm sure there is more mystique about Pearl Harber down there, considering the fate of the USS Oklahoma. Theres a small part of me that thinks an implement of war, such as a battleship, deserves an ending befitting it's role. Instead of rusting away in a shipyard like my state's battleship. I'm sure the men onboard might feel differently though.

We should always remember today.

I'm sure it won't take long for the trolls to ruin this thread though:)
Bo,
In a way, it was fitting for the Oklahoma to sink while being towed back to the mainland in 1947 and not have to be used for nuclear testing or be picked apart in an overseas operation.

In 1968-1970, there was still very much evidence of battle damage and gun emplacements of the "old Pearl Harbor."

I've lots of memories of the filming of "Tora Tora Tora," and for a good while, the sound of all the Texas Trainer "Zeros" flying over our house was a common occurence.

We'd go to Pearl to pick up my dad after he got off duty, and there were all the movie props, "burned up PBY's," sitting around.

We had moved to Oklahoma by the time the film was released, my dad was still stationed there, so it was tough to watch as it was more like watching a movie shot in your home town than it was an historical landmark.
 

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I used to work with a guy that was in the army on Wheeler field. Im glad he retired before we got the Mitsubishi forklifts. Hes 87 now and still around .
Then again, a man who lived across the street from me had a permanent disability from being injured by the Japs while serving on a carrier, and owned a Mitsubishi...I thought that odd.

I'd be willing to bet it was a Mitsubishi produced aircraft that hit his ship, even.

Then again, my father who served during the Korean War and is very well educated still has a tendency to call the Chinese "gooks."
 

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Bo,
In a way, it was fitting for the Oklahoma to sink while being towed back to the mainland in 1947 and not have to be used for nuclear testing or be picked apart in an overseas operation.

QUOTE]

Hey, I'm not familiar with this story, can ya tell me more? Was the Okie still upside-down? Maybe I should just wiki it eh?

BTW, I think 'ol Don said the all the civilian buildings around the city were painted black too. I could be wrong about that though, I was usually drinkin when I talked to him and I can't quite remember the details of all his stories.
 

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Bo,
In a way, it was fitting for the Oklahoma to sink while being towed back to the mainland in 1947 and not have to be used for nuclear testing or be picked apart in an overseas operation.

QUOTE]

Hey, I'm not familiar with this story, can ya tell me more? Was the Okie still upside-down? Maybe I should just wiki it eh?

BTW, I think 'ol Don said the all the civilian buildings around the city were painted black too. I could be wrong about that though, I was usually drinkin when I talked to him and I can't quite remember the details of all his stories.

USS Oklahoma was rolled up-right (it was quite an impressive job) using shore-sited winches and pretty well stripped (superstructure, guns, turrets, removed), torpedo damage patched and ship pumped out during the war. Post-war, sold to a West Coast firm for scrapping, and broke her tow lines and disappeared in a storm between Hawaii and the destination. Presumed to have taken on water and sunk, but truly nobody actually saw her go under to my understanding, so she may still be bobbing around somewhere at sea (not likely, but...).

There is a picture during the war after salvage showing Oklahoma with an I-class ship alongside. There is considerable difference in size...

EDIT - apparently there are some photos taken after Oklahoma broke her tow and was in extremis. So probably was seen to go down, my bad for not checking that before I posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hey, I'm not familiar with this story, can ya tell me more? Was the Okie still upside-down? Maybe I should just wiki it eh?
Just did that, interesting stuff out there, including one mans quest to finally get a memorial dedicated to the Okie at Pearl one year ago today!
 

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Then again, a man who lived across the street from me had a permanent disability from being injured by the Japs while serving on a carrier, and owned a Mitsubishi...I thought that odd.

I'd be willing to bet it was a Mitsubishi produced aircraft that hit his ship, even.

Then again, my father who served during the Korean War and is very well educated still has a tendency to call the Chinese "gooks."

I know what you mean. I know some very intelligent people who still refer to the Japanese as "Japs".

Go figure, huh?
 

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And I know some (on the record) rather intelligent folk (a Phi Beta Kappa in one case) who still call Vietnamese dinks. Come to think of it, i do that myself on occaision, and my recorded IQ is over 140 and i have a doctorate...
 

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And I know some (on the record) rather intelligent folk (a Phi Beta Kappa in one case) who still call Vietnamese dinks. Come to think of it, i do that myself on occaision, and my recorded IQ is over 140 and i have a doctorate...
My rule of thumb is: if they've shot at you, you can call them whatever you want...
 

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Must have been quite a sight watching the Okie turned back over on her top. Sinking on the way back home, perhaps that was her way of telling us she was already dead.
 

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Then again, a man who lived across the street from me had a permanent disability from being injured by the Japs while serving on a carrier, and owned a Mitsubishi...I thought that odd.

I'd be willing to bet it was a Mitsubishi produced aircraft that hit his ship, even.

Then again, my father who served during the Korean War and is very well educated still has a tendency to call the Chinese "gooks."
Why hold a grudge? We've made them into good democratic capitalist allies now. Celebrate, for it is our success as much as theirs that they're making cars now rather than fighter aircraft.
 

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It has been in only the last few years that my Grandfather would speak to an Oriental. They were all "Japs". After what he went through I will allow he can call them whatever he wishes. The same for a deceased friend of mine that was captured and tortured by the Japanese, as far as I was concerned he could call them whatever he wished. I've never had any problems with the Japanese myself. Although I am a bigot as I'm prejudiced against idiots and A##sholes no matter their Nationality or Religion. As a matter of fact several are on my ignore list so I no longer have to put up with their idiocy.
 

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We had a member of our church who was one of the last surviving crewmen of the Arizona. He was in the "old guys" Sunday school class with my father and was one of the nicest men you could every hope to meet. Just about every year a local news crew would interview him. He passed away two years ago.

He was at his station when he was informed by an Ensign that his section was to evacuate. He started his way topside and "woke up" in bad shape out in the water. A skiff pulled him out before he again lost consciousness and drown. Apparently he was thrown free when the forward explosion occurred. That's all he knew. Everyone he actually "knew" in the crew was killed. He very well knew how much chance and luck played in his survival.

One little note. He and his handful of comrades who survived actually being "on" the Arizona when she went down always distinguished themselves from the crewmen who were really not on board the ship when she was hit (a considerable number were on base but not on board). Seems like over the past 60 years a number of shipmates started being labeled "survivors" too.
 

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USS Oklahoma was rolled up-right (it was quite an impressive job) using shore-sited winches and pretty well stripped (superstructure, guns, turrets, removed), torpedo damage patched and ship pumped out during the war. Post-war, sold to a West Coast firm for scrapping, and broke her tow lines and disappeared in a storm between Hawaii and the destination. Presumed to have taken on water and sunk, but truly nobody actually saw her go under to my understanding, so she may still be bobbing around somewhere at sea (not likely, but...).

There is a picture during the war after salvage showing Oklahoma with an I-class ship alongside. There is considerable difference in size...
Clyde,
Few years ago I had checked out a book written by the Navy in the 1940's that went into detail as to how they righted and refloated the ships.
Was surprised to see it in the libarary, as it was more of a government manual, and was probably donated.

Very interesting book, and unbelievable as to what they went through to refloat and recommision the ships.

Flipping the Oklahoma back over was probably the most interesting.

The amount of cutting that was done on the Arizona to get her superstructure to water level was also phenomenal.
 
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