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Is it possible to tint boiled linseed oil?

The finish on my Ross Mk.II was ruined by somebody attempting to "restore" it, they stripped of all of the old oil that had turned that lovely reddish orange color. Is there a way and can make a new BLO finish look that way? Besides wait another 93 years?

Thanks in advance
 

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Oxide powder for colouring cement. Experement first as it is very hard to imposible to get it out once it is in the timber. Good luck. chester.
 

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Chestnut Ridge Military Stock Stain from Brownellś. Itś alcohol based. Experiment on scrap wood first, cutting it with alohol to get it right. It can be too red or is way too dark brown if used straight. Brownellś also has Pilkington tinted Linseed Oil, Red-Brown #703-355-502 which Ive used with good results. Did they actually use BLO on the Ross or was it Raw Linseed Oil or Raw Tung oil? Sprinfield used Raw Tung in production, not BLO. Donṫ know about the Ross' though. Interesting thing to research.
 

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My Ross really looked like it had been stained, then oil finished

You can mix Pilkington's with regular linseed oil if its too dark. Or experiment with the Minwax colored oil finishes in dozens of colors, mixing and matching.
 

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Good point about Minwax jjk308. The Minwax Mahogany, thinned a little, is great for nicks on Trapdoors and 1903s.
 

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Why mix stain/tint with BLO? Stain is usually a dye or pigment of small particle size dissolved or suspended in a low viscosity solvent. The idea is to promote deep and rapid absorption into wood via the solvent, which carries the pigment or dye along with it. Remember that properly applied BLO is not a surface finish, but is absorbed into the wood.

Tinted BLO would require numerous applications to get proper absorption, and would be hindered by the fact that, as BLO crosslinks when exposed to oxygen and polymerizes, it seals the wood to the point where subsequent absorption will be impeded. Spot matching an old finish color, especially if a darker color, will prove difficult.

Stick to established procedures of stain or dye first, then finish.

OTOH, if you're using a surface finish such as lacquer or shellac, tint would be workable, but an inappropriate material for refurbing oil-finished wood.

If you're going to strip an already ruined finish & start over, use a stain to try to match the original color. Finish with BLO, keeping in mind that the color will darken some after applying BLO.

Best thing to do is ask around to find out what the original Ross finish was. If it was an aged yellow surface finish, it may have been some kind of varnish, which yellows with little provocation anyway.
 

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Let me revise my answer to the question: "Is it possible to tint BLO?"

Sure, anything is possible, but it isn't widely practiced today, because it is an expedient or production cost/time cutting procedure that doesn't produce optimum results. There are too many better methods and materials for staining and finishing wood available today.

Again, stain pigments of fine particulate size penetrate wood better and more evenly when suspended in a low viscosity solvent or carrier. Due to the nature of old wood that has already had a varnishing oil finish absorbed into it, heavier vis materials will not easily or evenly absorb into the wood to produce an even coloration.
 

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I agree with AZshooter on the lighter vis. bit. The only time i used tinted BLO with the above mentioned oxide tint was on a very dry and blond pre ww1 win. 94 and i think i may have mixed a fair amount of turps to it as well. A long time ago but it still looks nice. I have also had good results with water based leather stains, And when dry give the BLO treatment. chester.
 

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Does anyone reading this thread know what the original Ross finish was? Don't want it "probably" was anything. Would really like to know.
 

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I have tinted blo with stain but the stain was not the common type.I used some old stuff from constentines real nasty stuff smells like a good old magic marker<xylol based?>came in a glass bottle.It stains everything it touches and will change the color of blo your hands and your garage floor
 

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Mackat,
That stuff smells good, too strong for me to use. Everyone likes something different though. My brother still puts maple in a box with acid to fume.
 

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Depends on the application, but I have had good results adding stain, such as Chestnut Ridge, to BLO for touch-ups. A small dash of Japan Drier will speed up and harden the process.
 

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Makat brought up an excellent point. If you add dye to BLO it will be very messy to work with the way most people apply it. You'll have to wear rubber gloves to touch the rifle until it dries and I suspect a lot of dye will continue to bleed off.

Stick with the tried and true of dye first, let dry and then BLO.
 
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