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Wow very cool love that 1895 Winchester thank you so much for sharing hopefully one day you might be able to get to shoot these. Of course extremely scarce rifles in my collection I hardly have ever shot if it's really rare I think I shot it one time just to say I did.
 

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My father grew up in Pispala and lived in a large rectangular house on the top of the slope while my grandfather was building a new home nearby. As a kid he just had to go into the attic and search around in the sawdust. A nicely wrapped-up, as new, 3 line Mosin turned up to his great surprise- but was missing the bolt. Since his brother was in the civil guard it wasn't a problem getting a replacement bolt.
So my uncle ended up taking it to war but it was lost when he was wounded.
 

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Ammo may have been stored differently .l.on property..?
 

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Amazing story... would love to see more detailed photos of the Winchester. One of my dream rifles.
 

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Amazing how they are well preserved after being in the attic for so many years! And the papers are a neat bonus! Any history on the house or its previous owner?
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
I do have a lot of history about the mansion. Three different noble families (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_nobility) have owned the house between 1556-1918. Ended up in Finnish Government ownership in 1980 and privatized again in 1997 and I bought the house from people, who bought it in 1997.

The reason, why the last noble family sold the place is quite grim. During the Civil War on the 31st of January 1918 "reds" came to the mansion looking for guns and didn't find any and shot the owner (31 year old man with a pregnant wife). Roughly 1 month later these rifles where hidden in the attic.

Family, who owned the mansion, where understandably horrified about the incident and decided to sell the mansion in late fall of 1918 (so few months after the Civil War ended).
 

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Good to know. There are 2 researchers from University of Oulu, who are doing a small scientific research paper on this find.

Brilliant! Thank you very much for the pictures and presentation. Newspapers rarely survive for very long. I hope the researchers can scan the newspapers. Who knows? There may be no extant examples of those day's papers anyplace anymore?

My ancestors all left Korsnäs and Malax about a decade before national independence and the civil war. And of course Vasa/Vaasa was the white area. I've been to Tampere, but never to Vihti. If you have a local history association or club a write up there might be of interest. You might be able to do a deed search or something like that and find who owned the house? Of course your history researchers may turn stuff like that up too.

Finns I spoke too seemed surprised to hear that the old "white" versus "red" divisions persisted in U.S. and Canadian Finnish immigrant communities? The politics of the 1930s, the Talvisota/ Winter War and Continuation War finally settled the "rift" but many Finnish Americans were isolated from those developments at least to a certain extent.

As you know, this is a spectacular find. Kiitos/ Tack tack for the pictures and account! Very interesting as we all "surf the net" looking for interesting things from our arm chairs during this period.
 

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I do have a lot of history about the mansion. Three different noble families (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_nobility) have owned the house between 1556-1918. Ended up in Finnish Government ownership in 1980 and privatized again in 1997 and I bought the house from people, who bought it in 1997.

The reason, why the last noble family sold the place is quite grim. During the Civil War 31st of January 1918 "reds" came to the mansion looking for guns and didn't find any and shot the owner (31 year old man with a pregnant wife). Roughly 1 month later these rifles where hidden in the attic.

Family, who owned the mansion, where understandably horrified about the incident and decided to sell the mansion in late fall of 1918 (so few months after the Civil War ended).
Ah-ha. Thank you for the details!
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Brilliant! Thank you very much for the pictures and presentation. Newspapers rarely survive for very long. I hope the researchers can scan the newspapers. Who knows? There may be no extant examples of those day's papers anyplace anymore?
One of the people here just informed, that these newspapers can be found in digitalized form in Finnish National Library (digi) Archive.
 

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Ah, I see. Kiitos! The digital archives of the national archives of Finland in Helsinki are spectacular. There is lots of genealogical information for family history, but also a lot of military history too. There are Finnish members here who find absolutely marvelous stuff there.

I'm glad that there are copies. Sometimes, in the U.S., there are small "home town" newspapers that are gone for good, but every now and then copies can be found that have survived.
 

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Brilliant! Thank you very much for the pictures and presentation. Newspapers rarely survive for very long. I hope the researchers can scan the newspapers. Who knows? There may be no extant examples of those day's papers anyplace anymore?

My ancestors all left Korsnäs and Malax about a decade before national independence and the civil war. And of course Vasa/Vaasa was the white area. I've been to Tampere, but never to Vihti. If you have a local history association or club a write up there might be of interest. You might be able to do a deed search or something like that and find who owned the house? Of course your history researchers may turn stuff like that up too.

Finns I spoke too seemed surprised to hear that the old "white" versus "red" divisions persisted in U.S. and Canadian Finnish immigrant communities? The politics of the 1930s, the Talvisota/ Winter War and Continuation War finally settled the "rift" but many Finnish Americans were isolated from those developments at least to a certain extent.

As you know, this is a spectacular find. Kiitos/ Tack tack for the pictures and account! Very interesting as we all "surf the net" looking for interesting things from our arm chairs during this period.
I can only speak to what I know about the Canadian Immigrant community. There was a lot of hard feelings about the revolution. Many of the 'reds' came to Canada with the idea that they would stage here and go back to fight again. It never happened and many die-hard leftists softened their ideas in old age.

Others went back to the Soviet Union after Stalin's call to build the new communist land. Many never made it back to Canada having been accused of being spies and having there passports confiscated. One family in our area made it back, barely, and warned the other leftists emphatically not to go to the Soviet Union. They were accused of lying, because things could not be like that in the USSR. How interesting that they would confide these stories with my father who was an officer in that 'criminal' Mannerheim's army in WW2!
 

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Brilliant! Thank you very much for the pictures and presentation. Newspapers rarely survive for very long. I hope the researchers can scan the newspapers. Who knows? There may be no extant examples of those day's papers anyplace anymore?

My ancestors all left Korsnäs and Malax about a decade before national independence and the civil war. And of course Vasa/Vaasa was the white area. I've been to Tampere, but never to Vihti. If you have a local history association or club a write up there might be of interest. You might be able to do a deed search or something like that and find who owned the house? Of course your history researchers may turn stuff like that up too.

Finns I spoke too seemed surprised to hear that the old "white" versus "red" divisions persisted in U.S. and Canadian Finnish immigrant communities? The politics of the 1930s, the Talvisota/ Winter War and Continuation War finally settled the "rift" but many Finnish Americans were isolated from those developments at least to a certain extent.

As you know, this is a spectacular find. Kiitos/ Tack tack for the pictures and account! Very interesting as we all "surf the net" looking for interesting things from our arm chairs during this period.
A good documentary to watch was made by the National Film Board of Canada called, 'Letters from Karelia' found on Vimeo. It does try to portray the SA in a negative light in my opinion.
Some communists serving in the SA did go to the Russian side too. After the war when my father worked at Tampella one of these deserters (now protected) asked my dad where he had been during the war. They both had been in the same area near Stalin's canal when he went over to the other side. He asked my dad if he would have shot him if he had seen him cross over. The response was 'yes.'
 

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It looks like someone thought that the best place to hide something is somewhere that has already been searched.
 

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It looks like someone thought that the best place to hide something is somewhere that has already been searched.
Yeah, right? Of course, depending on the date of the murder of the young man who resided there, it could be the very guns the reds were searching for? Wrap 'em up in their own "party propaganda organ" for "plausible deniability?" Definitely a mystery! A creative writer could spin off an interesting piece about this find as well as the historical research, no?
 

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Some beautiful guns! bet the sawdust helped keep them from becomming rusted junk piles,,,,, Congratulation on the find!
 
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