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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had this rifle for awhile now and have never posted it. I know very little about Krags but I always wanted one and was able to get this at a good (I think) price. I just wanted to get a little feedback on the rifle and it's value and hear any thoughts on it.

Mechanically it is in good shape and functions/fires excellent. The stock looks to be the original but I'm not sure if it was ever sanded/refinished or not. The metal is in good shape with very little of the bluing remaining. There is some old light pitting on top of the barrel that was cleaned up.



























 

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Everything looks prim and proper. It was made in April of 1900, so the stock is probably original to the rifle. All the parts and pieces match patina-wise, so it likely never saw an overhaul, nor does it appear it that it was ever touched with a piece of sandpaper. One thing I see that you'll have to check out for yourself, is that it appears the barrel may have been freefloated, see if you can slide a piece under it from band to band, or thereabouts. It might have been someones target rifle back in the "Days of the Krag" and one often runs into that. I have one that's floated from receiver ring to the rear band, they left a little touch there, and filed the band to fit the wood, but barely touch the metal, then it's floated to a point about a half inch behind the upper band. If it's been a long while since it was done, the channel will be about the same color as the tip of the stock, they must have blackened the channel with something, or it's from the heat of the barrel. Value in today's market, no less than $1000, likely to go for more. The slightly different color of the handguard "might" mean the rear sight was changed at some point in it's service. Early in 1900 the rifles may have been issued with the 1898 or 1896 sight. They had a 2200fps loading in 1898 that didn't work out, too hot, it was cracking locking lugs and receivers and was withdrawn within a year. Most rifles with the 1898 sight calibrated for that load were recalled and the 1896 sight but back on. The ammo was recalled and reloaded too. Your rifle may not have made it back to the armory in time to get the 1896 sight and got the later, and better, 1901 sight that it now wears. They tried to get the handguards to match, but it was sometimes hard. The orange color of your stock is a walnut imported from Italy that was used for a few years during a shortage of American black walnut. I bet it's real orange in the lightening cuts of the barrel channel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for all that information andiarisaka. My Krag knowledge has been multiplied!

I broke the rifle down this morning and you are right about the stock. It was freefloated and there looks to be a little of some bedding compound near the front band, rear band and the rear tang. It also has the orange color in the lightning cuts of the stock from the Italian walnut you mentioned. That was the reason I was wondering about the stock maybe being refinished because most of the Krags i've seen have that deep and dark color to the stock.

The bore is in very good condition, sharp and clean rifling but there is a little bit of frosting from corrosive ammunition use. ME gauges at a 1, it's a very good shooting rifle and very accurate. I have only fired the Winchester 180 grain PP factory ammo through it so far.
 

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Glad to hear I was right about something, for a change. That bedding compound wouldn't be within the rules for CMP Vintage rifle matches, but the only place it'd get looked at in that regard is at Camp Perry, if you did good. I'm working on a load with a hard cast 190gr spitzer bullet this year, I can't afford those jacketed thingies anymore, but I have lots of lead based babbitts stashed away. The bullet was meant for the Mosin, drops with .317 bands which I size down to .311 before heat treating, and very fat nose that really stuffs the throat of my Krags. The 92/96 I have that has been bedded similar to yours is very accurate. With the right load, 1" 100yd groups are easy and that's pretty good for a 118yr old rifle. I have a friend who is selling quick load chargers for the Krag on the Jouster.com and Krag Collector's Association forums if you think you might be interested in shooting yours in a vintage match at some point.
 
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