Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,813 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently picked up a 1944 Sako M39 that has a "new" bore and WW2 Sako stock in "unissued" condition. Should I shoot this, or make it a safe queen? I'm sure there will be mixed responses - a side that will say that rifles are made to be shot and a side that will say that I should preserve its condition. Part of me really wants to take this rifle to the range. My question really is: if I don't intend to throw 1,000 rounds through the rifle and if I appropriately clean and maintain it, will shooting it really impact its value?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
829 Posts
If you start to shoot it, just clean it. Don't let solvents or oil soak into the stock. If you are worried about shooting it, start reloading and use cast bullets instead of surplus ammo. Those things will have that rifle looking pretty for your kids to use when they're an adult. The value in my opinion, won't be changed that much if anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,813 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you start to shoot it, just clean it. Don't let solvents or oil soak into the stock. If you are worried about shooting it, start reloading and use cast bullets instead of surplus ammo. Those things will have that rifle looking pretty for your kids to use when they're an adult. The value in my opinion, won't be changed that much if anything.
Do you suggest cast bullets rather than surplus because they will be much more gentle on the rifling than FMJ?
 

·
Gold Bullet Member
Joined
·
9,970 Posts
If you have other rifles to fire, them use em for shooting, if this is your only rifle, ya can't hurt it by firing the piece. I generally do not fire my rifles/carbines if they are really uncommon.

Many 1944 Sako M39's are in nice condition, ya won't ding the value much by shooting it.

Pahtu.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
829 Posts
Do you suggest cast bullets rather than surplus because they will be much more gentle on the rifling than FMJ?
Basically. Plus, if you do reload for the rifle you will achieve superb accuracy from it. Only downside is that it costs quite a bit of money to get started. Last week for example, I took a modern .308 winchester rifle that was shooting 2.2 inch MOA at 100 yards with commercial ammo and got in down to a 0.367 inch group. The "flyer" in the group was able to be covered with a quarter. The four shot group was covered by a penny. Reloading gets you outstanding results.

ETA: My 1944 SK.Y M39 that I'm picking up this week will go through a bore slugging and will be going through the exact thing I told you. I couldn't be more excited about it.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
9,172 Posts
Do you suggest cast bullets rather than surplus because they will be much more gentle on the rifling than FMJ?
Bullets do not wear out rifle bores; hot propellant gasses are the cause of wear: that and excessive and incorrect use of a steel cleaning rod. Shooting cast bullets also reduces the amount of propellant and resulting gas erosion. But how do you know the rifle is "unissued?" Is there an arsenal tag attached with a "syopaste 0" annotation? Shoot it. Do not indulge in rapid fire. Leave the bolt open after every shot and allow 30 seconds between shots for cooling.
 

·
Gold Bullet Member
Joined
·
4,581 Posts
You have others or only this one. if you have others don't shoot it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,813 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Bullets do not wear out rifle bores; hot propellant gasses are the cause of wear: that and excessive and incorrect use of a steel cleaning rod. Shooting cast bullets also reduces the amount of propellant and resulting gas erosion. But how do you know the rifle is "unissued?" Is there an arsenal tag attached with a "syopaste 0" annotation? Shoot it. Do not indulge in rapid fire. Leave the bolt open after every shot and allow 30 seconds between shots for cooling.
I don't have anything certifying that it's got a "new" bore. That's the description the seller used (although we all know how certain sellers like to exaggerate!), but my inspection reveals that it does indeed have a very sharp, strong, mirror bore. I'm sure it's seen bullets, but it is in really good shape. The stock is WW2 and is pristine.

I have one other Sako M39 but it's not nearly as nice. The bluing is 60% compared to the 90% of this one, the action is a little rough, and the stock is dinged and dented. The bore is also mirror sharp, but it's not nearly as nice as my most recent acquisition. I could just shoot that one to death but I hate seeing a rifle in my safe that only comes out for show and tell! I clean all my rifles with a Tipton one-piece rod and bore guide. I'm very careful.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top