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I'll never understand WHY some of these countries have such STUPID fking laws for old rifles like this!!!!

I love the stock color/ Sako marking on this. The rest of the rifle is ruined.


3780980

3780982
 

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So sorry to see this, just horrible. Was this done by their customs?
Japanese deactivation laws, private firearms ownership is virtually impossible in Japan and as a result the market for deactivated firearms is huge and expensive.......and you guys think we have it bad here in the UK!!!.
 

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There is something odd or suspicious to me about this. I am no professional welder, and I could do a heck of a lot better job of that. I mean to say, even if the welding had to be located as shown, I could a much neater job. A good man, with TIG could do an amazing job. I have better welding on my tractor bucket. Not a joke. That was stick, not even MIG.

Here I am making a big assumption, that the receiver has to be welded like that. That was quite excessive. Heck, the same bolt weld could have been made from the underside! If needed at all?

Now, I read these demil guns are expensive! This is not adding up.
 

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There is something odd or suspicious to me about this. I am no professional welder, and I could do a heck of a lot better job of that. I mean to say, even if the welding had to be located as shown, I could a much neater job. A good man, with TIG could do an amazing job. I have better welding on my tractor bucket. Not a joke. That was stick, not even MIG.

Here I am making a big assumption, that the receiver has to be welded like that. That was quite excessive. Heck, the same bolt weld could have been made from the underside! If needed at all?

Now, I read these demil guns are expensive! This is not adding up.
Not all deactivated guns are created equally, here in the UK the deactivation process is very through and irreversible but they are done in such a way that visually they appear intact, on stuff like bolt action rifles you can still work the bolt.In Japan I would imagine they take whatever deactivated guns they can get, some will be better than others I’d imagine.It may also depend on when it was deactivated, for example here in the UK the deactivation process and what is required has changed a few times over the years, pre-1995 it took very little to “deactivate” a firearm legally but criminals where reactivating them with basic tools/ basic knowledge so subsequently the process became more involved to the point now where it is virtually impossible to reactivate them without specialist knowledge/tooling and parts and it would probably be far easier to obtain an already functional firearm on the black market if you were criminally-minded enough.
 

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Tiny Swiss army knives are considered deadly weapons there.
Just how their legal system exists.
No weapons.
So many people crowded into a small area, they developed severe social controls ling ago.
Lowest murder rate in the world, I think.
 

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It is possible to own certain live firearms there,although they are EXTREMELY tightly controlled,as is the ammunition for them. Just way to difficult for most to comply with the requirements.So if deactivated firearms are able to be legally owned its logical that there will be a large market for them,instead.It is a shame that rifle was vandalised the way it was....they can be done in a way their external appearance is still Ok but very difficult to re-activate.Not like the rifle pictured.
 

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I hosted several individuals from Japan over the years, and introduced them to American style shooting (everything but the kitchen sink) They loved it, but still couldn't understand why we were allowed such things in our homes.
 

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I hosted several individuals from Japan over the years, and introduced them to American style shooting (everything but the kitchen sink) They loved it, but still couldn't understand why we were allowed such things in our homes.
There’s been a few guys from the US that have been to my club range here in the UK as guests whilst they’ve been staying with relatives that are club members and they’ve been quite surprised at what we can own at home and shoot.........
 

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The common people of Japan were effectively disarmed since 1588. They have no tradition such as our U.S. Bill of Rights.
 

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I have to agree with the above concerning Japanese citizens.
When I worked for NASA (4 months short of 40 years) I would often be tasked to host Japanese personnel from the Japanese Space Program.
When they found out I was a Gun Collector, Instructor and to boot collected Japanese Military Items, just about every one of them wanted to go to the range with me.
They could just not fathom how a normal citizen could own rifles, handguns or machineguns, and shoot them when ever they wanted to.
Many of the visitors had never even touched a firearm before, they are from a totally different culture.
 

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It is possible to own certain live firearms there,although they are EXTREMELY tightly controlled,as is the ammunition for them. Just way to difficult for most to comply with the requirements.So if deactivated firearms are able to be legally owned its logical that there will be a large market for them,instead.It is a shame that rifle was vandalised the way it was....they can be done in a way their external appearance is still Ok but very difficult to re-activate.Not like the rifle pictured.
Didn't the Australian gun ban call for filling the barrel completely with something as an alternative to turning it in?

What are the current requirements for firearms ownership in New Zealand after the recent ban?
 
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