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Diamond Bullet Member and the Revered Sir Jim
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Naval History & Heritage Command


#WarshipWednesday: The USS Wyoming (Monitor #10) was commissioned in December 1902 at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California. Operating with the protected cruiser Boston in the spring of 1904 in Panamanian waters, she assisted and evacuated American lives during their civil war. She served until decommissioned in August 1905 and converted to burn fuel oil. She was placed in and out of commission a few times until recommissioned in July 1910, then trained the Washington State Naval
Militia. In the prior year, she was renamed Cheyenne to clear-up the name for USS
Wyoming (Battleship #32).
You can find a a model of the monitor when named Cheyenne on display
in the Great White Fleet exhibit at the National Museum of the United States Navy, Building 76

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A bankrupt idea in the flesh.
I dunno, didn't the Brits get some useful duty out of them in both wars? I remember reading about them in the frustrating effort to take and open the port of Antwerp in the fall of 1944.

I peeked - yes they were there: Battle of the Scheldt - Wikipedia

I always found the idea of a 12" or 15" naval gun on a glorified version of Huck Finn's raft darned cool! (OK, their vessels were a little more impressive than Huck's. ;-)

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Erebus-class monitor - 12 knots with pedal to the medal.
(Huck might have exceeded that going downsteam in a narrow channel on the Big Muddy. ;-) )
 

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British monitors were a bit more seaworthy than the Wyoming.
 

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The Uk built and used the monitors as shore bombardment vessels. The American plan was to use them as harbor defense vessels, that is the bankrupt idea.
Quicker and cheaper than coast defense installations and not really that bad for boosting the firepower at a harbor. And would have been useful for fire support in a contested landing if we'd run any while we had the things. Now - as complete substitute for coast defense artillery and beach defenses - very bankrupt idea indeed, dating all the way back to Tom Jefferson - who was mighty smart in some ways, but a damp fool in naval matters.

And while not built for the duty, we used them with considerable utility as submarine base tenders in WWI. The low freeboard helped, there. And it turned out they were good experimental vessels to determine whether super-firing turrets were workable (British belief to the contrary, turned out not a problem, leading to our earliest all-big-gun ships having what is generally deemed the best turret arrangement for such vessels). IIRC, monitor USS Florida was the main test ship
 

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A number of Monitors were deployed in the Mediterranean theatre during WW1, with M15 being sunk off Gazza by UC-38.
There is quite a long history of their use in British service.
 
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