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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Info regarded type of diopters used 1982....

Nearly hundred shooters (91) that had highest results at the "Svenska Dagbladets Riksskytte" 1982 were asked what type of diopters they used. 82 of them answered. All of them used some kind of CG63 or CG80, none a m/96.
Elit, 31 shooters.
Söderin, 21 shooters.
Hauge, 19 shooters.
GF, 9 shooters.
"other" 2 shooters. (one Hooka and one Lyman. The Lyman regarded to be an exclusive diopter for range-target shooting).
One note was that Hauge almost only was choosen among the highest class of shooters while Södern seemed to be the choice for "ordinary" shooters.

A news for August 1982 was that GF could deliver CG80 WITHOUT plastic bedded action/barrel. This made a reduction on price with 175 Crowns. Many shooters disliked GFs method of "two-points bedding" and wanted a "full bedding".

Already January 1983 came an unexpected announcement. A meeting between the Danish ,Norwegian and Swedish FSR-organisations had taken place. A mutual new Nordic rifle had been discussed. FSR-board ensured though, that this was nothing that would be put into reality until end of the millenium. How this affected production of CG80 and the feeling among shooters this awoked is something I soon will get back to.
Regards,
ARILAR:)
 

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The rise and fall of the cg80

Hi Arilar,I have these 2 cg 80`s rifles, the older type.I did some measuring,Rifle (#1) length of barrel 660.5mm front of barrel18.00mm behind front sight 23.54mm near reciever 32.29mm marked date 1978.Rifle (#2 )660.5mm^18.00mm^22.76mm^31.68mm,this one has no date marked on reciever.They are both hammer forged barrels And no ajustable cheek piece.The fist one marked on barrel (k inside a c under that f then AE.)The second one is marked on barrel same as first one.
 

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Hi Arilar,and all members I have been very,very,occupied with lots of work at hand,fist chance I get I will post pictures of the 2 CG80`s that I have posted measurments of the barrels.Arilar would you want me to post pictures of the left handed FSR89 also.Excellent thread Arilar,can not get any better than this for us cllectors,just love this Forum,thankyou all again,unclegeorge
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
I will start a thread on the FSR89 within a month or so. I suggest you save that pearl until then;). More to come in this thread also but be patient with me.
Regards,
ARILAR:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 · (Edited)
1984 and CG80-production slows down

In early 1984 is reported from "Hålaveds Trä" that 6000 stocks (made out of American walnut) for CG80 had been delivered to GF. GF had at that point so many stocks "in stock" so Hålaveds didnt thought demand to be so big that year. Even though the moveable cheek-rest had been a positive detail for the CG80 were many shooters not ready to leave the CG63. A strong group of skilled shooters that called themselves "Skytteringen" opposed to the CG80. Claimed the receiver to be to weak and adviced shooters to wait, specially when a new Nordic rifle was discussed.

Gunsmiths and top-shooters during the 80s that I have spoken to has a feeling that the production totaly of CG80 maybe not exceeded 6000 rifles. (out of 400 stocks sent to Hålaveds for cutting out the cheek-rest were only four of them stocks for left-handed shooters. That makes 1% lefties and maybe not more than around 50-70 totaly produced).

The switch by FSR-board about Nordic rifle came fast. From "somewhere in a future far away" were the first test-shooting performed in July 1984. 7 countries with 13 different makers and 16 different rifles competed at this first point. The test were performed by 11 skilled Swedish shooters and gunsmiths. I have talked to a handfull of them.

In June came complaints from GF that they were only selling 200 CG80s (ordered from scratch) each year. Seems that it had been so for a couple of years. Above that were around the same amount "parts" for CG80 delivered to the FSR-approved gunsmiths. This also indicates that the 6000 stocks from Hålaveds were to be enough for GF. The FSR-shooters were holding on to the CG63 and waited for the Nordic rifle.

New test in Sweden in May 1985 by five shooters each from Sweden, Norway and Denmark. Now reduced to 13 rifles (Eriks Våpenteknikk, Kongsbergs from Norway), (Mause-Werke, Sauer&Sohn, Heym and Krico from Germany),(Remington from England),(S&L from Denmark),(Tikka from Finland),(Styer-Mannlicher from Austria),(FFV, Lano and Erress from Sweden). Interesting is that Busk-diopter were mounted on 10 of the rifles, Anschutz on two and Diana on one of the rifles. The 6 best rifles after evaluation in September could go further for new tests summer 1986 (in Copenhagen). Before that a winter-test 1985/86.

In the new test summer 1986 not only prototypes, several rifles from each producer were requiered.
A descision on rifle to be made in November 1986 and production started 1½ year later.
So this was what every FSR-shooter knew already in summer 1985. Strange if GF could sell one singel CG80 after that date.....In fact, this woke up strong, angry feelings among many shooters. FSR lost many members each time a new rifle-model came after the m/96.

Well....the last test was a winter-test held in Norway january 1987. The model choosen was the Sauer 200 STR (Scandinavian Target Rifle) and it was taken 4th of December 1987 in Copenhagen. Sweden got the first 750 of them in spring 1990. Before that had also the FSR89 been born but that is another story I will get back to later.

BTW. The GF original CG80 barrel (655 mm, hammered and heavy) has 220 twist (found the info just now).
Regards,
ARILAR:)
 

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Great thread Arilar. It is a treat to have someone like you to do the research. Thank you.

So this was what every FSR-shooter knew already in summer 1985. Strange if GF could sell one singel CG80 after that date.....In fact, this woke up strong, angry feelings among many shooters. FSR lost many members each time a new rifle-model came after the m/96.

I wonder if we as collectors and shooters don't have this very reason to be thankful for the bulk of our Swedish rifle collections. If the M96 had not been out classes by newer CG-63's and CG-80's then many of the rifles we now love to shoot might still be in Sweden at FSR clubs being rebuild and shoot by this generation.

Smokepole50
 

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What about the approved gunsmith-issue then??

Well, first we have to understand that this had a major importans for a limited time of maybe 10-15 years. How is that? Before the CG63 era (prior to 1964), the m/96-era was the military "tyg-stationer" the main contributor in changing wornout barrels for FSR-shooters. They had the stock of spareparts like barrels and other things, the knowledge AND the deal with FSR to handle it.

As explained before was GF in need of skilled gunsmiths to handle mounting of the GF-diopter and they also performed all kind of work with the rifles including changing barrels, plastic beddings and so on. I have talked to a handful gunsmiths that GF used but also GFs own gunsmith and even Normas leading gunsmith in the period 60s-80s. He is now 93 years old.

They all ensure me that during the CG63-era none markings was forced to be done. Only one gunsmith seemed to sometime place a mark on the receiver and that was Ingvar Jansson. He is since many years gone. So, during the 60s we know how GF and Norma marked on receiver their work.

When we reach 1981 and the first course for FSR-approved gunsmiths in Eskilstuna I have given you their names. Have spoken to some of them and gunsmiths that later came. None of the later (have interviewed 3 of them) took a course instead known gunsmiths and got approval anyway through FSR. A few of the gunsmiths seems to have been busy building CG63 or CG80 but mostly the gunsmiths were occupied with changing barrels, beddings and small repairs, putting in Kongsbergs or S&L trigger-systems et.c. When 1981 had passed they all got their marking with initials or numbers. One of the gunsmiths tells that they were FORCED to put the marking on the new barrel that was mounted (the rest tells that it was customary to do this). I think that it was a demand that the gunsmiths should mark the barrels they mounted put because the most barrels came from others sources than GF and the urge for a CG80 didnt last so many years this demand is somewhat forgotten (and maybe not followed). Funny is that three different early approved gunsmiths claim that they separately was first to import S&L-barrels from Ulf Larsen direcly. The Shilen-barrels was imported by an independed gun-dealer that top-shooters got the barrels from.

Several gunsmiths has told me that the CG63-era was the golden period for them. Because most shooters kept the CG63 this hold to the Sauer were introduced fully 1990. Very few were involved in the FSR89.

When the Sauer came no more qualified work in quantities was needed.
AS time went and new regulations came regarding the rifles it reflected immediately the older model. For example: the handguard could be taken away from CG63 (and m/96) to accomodate the bigger barrels. Pistolgrips allowed on m/96. Even a Sauer 200 STR cheek-rest is allowed to mount on a m/96 (never used I would think). When CG80 was introduced no m/96 to be seen in use at major events. After Sauern got introduced the earlier models was gone fast. FSR89 was vanished about ten years after it was born.

I have been shooting FSR range-shooting myself for the last 4 month. In the club-champs did 11 shooters take part. Because it was a 70-years anniversary some old-timers showed up. We were two using CG63, two using CG80, one a FSR89 and the the rest Sauer. Some weeks later a regional Champs with 21 shooters. I was the only one that didnt use a Sauer 200 STR and struggled with my CG63. A week ago I participated in the Swedish National Champs on 300 meters range-shooting, prone. 146 shooters and again the only shooter without a Sauer (in this case dont count my friend , a pistol-shooter, that just for fun came with a m/96 and had a go). Many old shooters very much appreciated me and my friend for showing up.
I will soon post on some of the gunsmiths marks I am aware of.
Regards,
ARILAR:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Stocks for CG80 made out of plastic??

Already in the start 1980 was declared that, after tests that needed to be performed, it was likely that a stock out of plastic soon should be ready to be delivered. It didnt take so long time before this seemed to be more difficult than earlier believed. As demand after a few years fell for the CG80 this tryouts were put aside. Not until 1985 decided by FSR that this "plastic-stock" idea was cancelled.
Of course in 1985 the try-outs for the new Nordic rifle was the main interest.
If anyone heard of or seen a prototype plastic stock for CG80 it would interest us all if further info is available.
Regards,
ARILAR:)
 

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Great!! Looking forward to see the pics. Must be a very unusual piece.:)
Yes it is a very unusual piece,I thought it was a varnished wood stock,but when I examined it very closely,I said to myself wow,is this aplastic stock.Did I ,get a big surprise.The interesting thing about this stock ,I was told that it came from a place where you can get (fairy dust that can only be gathered on midsummers eve.....
 

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Back on the gunsmiths!

So, when first FSR-approved gunsmith course were held in Eskilstuna in late 1981 were already six gunsmiths "in business" under the wings of GF. I have talked to three of them. Seems that late 60s and around 1970 were the time several of them got to be fulltime gunsmiths. A lot of work with the CG63s that had been manufactured in big quantities by GF and from older m/96 by Norma. But... not all of the gunsmiths were putting together CG63s. In most cases switching barrels, mounting new trigger-systems and sofort was enough. None of the gunsmiths recall that they had to (or did) mark the weapons in any way during the CG63-era. Seems that one gunsmith, Ingvar Jansson, was alone marking the receiver.

At the course 1981 did 16 "pupils" attend. 35 gunsmiths had contacted FSR as interested to take the course but only 16 invited.
If we look in "Crown Jewels" page 134-135 we can see 30 approved gunsmiths or companies. The gunsmiths with marks 1-14 is among the once taken the first course 1981.

Among the 16 is also K-G Nilsson, Lars Andersson and Per-Olof Cronholm that already were working for GF. K-G got mark 14, Lars Andersson mark 99 and P-O Cronholm mark 17.

Other on the course were Hans Gustafsson mark 1, Hans Eriksson mark 2, , Åke Cansund mark 4, Erik Lundgren mark 6, Bo Andersson mark 7, Ingemar Johansson mark 8, Bengt Johanesson mark 9, Henry Svensson mark 10, Uno Olofsson mark 11, Bengt Nordin mark 12, Per-Åke Andersson mark 13.
What numbers to use for marks that Enar Carlsson, J-H Emilsson, Johan Ask and Arne Fredin got is unkonwn for me at this point. They are not included in the list in "Crown Jewels". This list was the current list when Crown Jewels was printed 2003 but not updated by FSR in a long time. Several of the gunsmiths in this list hadnt been active for many years. Guess that the last four gunsmiths above wasnt in practise 2003.

Conny Samuelsson with mark 3 is not listed as a pupil in the first course. Maybe no more course was held. Gunnar Larsson with mark 23 came in later and didnt ever take a course of any kind.

On the list in "Crown Jewels" is also found four more gunsmiths with numbers as mark that were included after the course and they are:
Stig Andersson mark 16, Nils-Inge Olsson mark 19, Sven-Erik Palm mark 21, Håkan Lidman mark 22.

Besides Alvar Holmgren with mark AH and Norma with mark NP "Crown Jewels" list include seven more gunsmiths that now have letters instead of numbers as marks. One of them started as gunsmith when Sauern 1990 came as the FSR main rifle and maybe that goes with the rest of those gunsmiths. Of course many of them probably have switched barrels on the older models CG63 and CG80. This gunsmiths and marks are:
Krister Nilsson KN, Tommy Wikström LTWs, Rolf Eklund RVT, Kjell Hedlund FV, Johan Dahlqvist JD, Kenneth Persson KP, Patriks Jakt och Skytteservice PC and Kalix Precision C.

Several of the gunsmiths that worked during the CG63-CG80era has told me that when CG80 came it was mandatory to mark the barrels if they mounted a new one but nothing else required. When FSR89 came and the ultra-shortened stroke length (8 mm) became fashion had the gunsmith to mark the cocking piece with his mark. In the 2003 edition of FSR-rules is this the ONLY mandatory marking left that gunsmiths had to do when working on the FSR-rifles. Even the barrel-marking seems now not to be mandatory.

This is pretty much all I have to report on the CG80 at this point. Feel free all to give inputs if you have any or discuss all above. Maybe Dutchman wants to unlock the thread "CG63 Target Rifles--Genuine with markings or built by Bjubba with no markings?" and we take it from there?
Regards,
ARILAR:)
 

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Happy Newyear Arilar and members,I learned alot from this Forum thanks to everyone that gave their input and put alot of their effort for the wealth of info. that was given in 2010.Hope for the year 2011 is the same success story thank you all again.Hi Arilar I know you must be very occupied as usual,but I have something? It is on a target rifle ; on top of rifle barrel is written (circlel inside J AND #90400 ON the barrel),when you will find the time thakyou!!!!!
 
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