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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hoping that my Danish Krag also had the much-touted feature of "controlled-feed" of cartridges from the magazine to the chamber and to the final ejection of spent cartridges, found in military Mauser and British Lee-Enfield bolt rifles, which mechanically ensures a "jam-free" loading cycle operation of the bolt and cartridges because the bolt and cartridges become locked together by the ejector spring as soon as the bolt engages the cartridge and stays together until the spent cartridge is ejected by the ejector spring.

I then loaded up my Danish Krag magazine with five rounds and cycled the cartridges through the chamber only to discover that my Danish Krag is a "push-feed" only bolt action rifle. However, this Krag rifle "push-feed" system of cartridges works well, and I have never come across any reports of loading cycle malfunctions of anyone of the Danish, Norwegian, and American Krag rifles.
 

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Norwegian Krag has controlled-feed design. Text and photos from Historic Firearm of the Month, September 2001
Norwegian Krag Bolt Face and Bolt Head, showing position of extractor relative to where the cartridge head would be.
Photo by Pete DeMeo
The M1894 differs from the Danish and American Krags in that it incorporates features designed to prevent double loading. . . This problem is addressed in the M1894 as follows: As the 6.5mm cartridge is pushed forward by the bolt, the rim engages underneath the extractor hook prior to the round's clearing the magazine box. The cartridge is thus under the control of the extractor from the time it leaves the magazine until ejection, preventing double loading.
 

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Thank you for the most interesting article about the history of the Norwegian Krag. I am surprised that the Danish Rustmester Rasmussen who later changed his name to Bjarnov and others with authority within the Danish Army did not suggest or demand a "controlled-feed" system for the Danish Krag, well-proven by the Norwegian Krag. The Danes also worked very closely with the Norwegian designers of the Krag rifle and therefore knew that the Norwegian opted for a "controlled-feed" system in their version of the Krag rifle. The same goes for the American manufacture of the Krag rifle which is in spite of being available, also like the Danish Krag choose to omit the "controlled-feed" system of their rimmed cartridges.

Also alarming that the Norwegian Krag in spite of having a strong dual locking lugs system also had a built-in weakness in the frame of the action itself, preventing higher pressure cartridges other than the original lower pressure, and Norwegian made 6.5x55 cartridges to be safely fired from the Norwegian Krag. Thus, in spite of firing only low-pressure Norwegian 6.5x55 ammunition, a number of the Norwegian Krag's would due to this built-in weakness of the frame, over time developed cracks in the frame, and attempts were made to remedy this build in flaw by adding more metal to the frame was therefore deemed necessary by the Norwegians for the shooter's safety.

Please, for your own and others' safety, check your Norwegian Krag for any cracks in the frame, and if you find any cracks, relegate your Norwegian Krag to a collectible wall-hanger. Until then, avoid shooting any Norwegian Krag rifles.

The author writes:

One weak spot on the Krag receiver is the corner near the rib on the bolt when the bolt is in the closed position. On the early Norwegian made Krags this was a sharp corner, and whenever there was a failure in one of these receivers, the crack seemed to start at the sharp corner. On the later production the corner was slightly rounded, which made it stronger.
 
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