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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I searched the forum to see the history of the Black Sea Navy story. I can't recall how it got started, but I do recall it was a notion, or idea, theory, not substantiated by any documentary evidence. We all know communist Bulgaria was a very secretive lot, in fact, they were counted on to do the USSR's dirty work in a great many instances. The forum in it's last reincarnation only goes back to 2007, and I found references to BSNs in 2/2008, so I suspect the idea precedes this latest version of forum software.

I'm not up on metallurgy and the like, but one example I can think of is the marine Remington 870 shotgun - it is nickle plated, not chromed. The chromed rifles I have seen in collecting have almost always been, if not something done by Classic Arms, a parade rifle. SKS carbines for example.

So, since we've been discussing alleged Black Sea Navy pistols, I'm thinking now is a good time to re-examine this notion. It would seem to me to make more sense that these were some type of parade pistol used for ceremonies rather than for a Navy. This would certainly account for the very small number of them that have shown up, you'd think a navy would be better equipped with small arms, though I recognize that mostly only officers might have a sidearm.

Thoughts?

SlimTim
 

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I deleted my post because it was nickel not chrome plating that Detroit applied to their revolvers. But they did have a policy of plating the revolvers AFTER buying them blued. They would then after accepting the blued revolver send them out to be commercially plated afterwards.
 

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I suspect there aren't more than a half dozen people in the world who refer to a chromed Makarov as a "Black Sea Navy". My vague recollection is that George or Karl at Makarov.com coined the term more as a "place holder" than as an actual reference to the pistol's origin. I'd be in favor of discontinuing the use of BSN until Boris shows us examples of them on ships.

Presentation pieces seems right. There were so many Maks made for so many distinct units ...
 

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Now that you mention it, other than parades, ceremonies, or other show & tell, I cannot think of any reason why a military unit would pay extra $ to shiny plate a weapon, be it nickel, chrome, or whatever. Gray or dark blue weapons for the navy, maybe. But chrome or nickel? No tactical advantage that I can think of, but I can think of several tactical disadvantages.
 

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If i remember right george had a confirmation from someone in bulgaria that they were actually done for their navy. If they were intended for parades or cermonial use i don't see how they would have the wear that we see on them, all ive seen look to be well used.
 

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I can see the value of plating a firearm which will be used extensively near a salt water environment. Especially in a conscript army/navy where maintenance may not be performed as assiduously as it should be, perhaps not tactical, but practical.
 

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I deleted my post because it was nickel not chrome plating that Detroit applied to their revolvers. But they did have a policy of plating the revolvers AFTER buying them blued. They would then after accepting the blued revolver send them out to be commercially plated afterwards.
Yes, Because Detroit used salt a lot during winter, ( Detroit sits atop a huge salt deposit) the police department nickel plated all their revolvers. They did this plating locally as it was cheaper to do it in Detroit, then pay what colt was charging . This is one example of nickel plating for a police dept. I do not know of any others.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was under the notion that nickel might provide more protection in a marine environment than chrome, but I am not learned in this area. Any experts out there?

SlimTim
 

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I have serious doubts about chrome/nickel makarovs being for naval use because of salt air. if that was the case their AKs on board ship would have the same finish.

Russian sailors on board a ship with AKs



as for ceremonial use, I don't see that as well. when the Makarov is in it's holster you don't even see the pistol at all, not even the bottom of the mag well. the entire purpose of a ceremonial weapon is for it to be distinctive and most importantly SEEN to wow people. so what would be the point of making it for ceremonial use, if it will never be seen? rifles for ceremonial use, yes because it's highly visible and everybody see it and is impressed. but for a pistol that won't ever be seen by anybody? naw, it doesn't make any sense.

makarovs that are chrome/nickel finished. it either are ones that were made for presentation pieces, and I have doubts about that as well. or, and this the most likely reason that they exist at all; the importer wanted some makarovs chrome finished at the country of origin OR they had it chrome plated here and then market it as something it's not. ie. naval or ceremonial for the American market

there is/was no such of a animal as a "SKS PARATROOPER". that was strictly a American invention to market it for the American market as something that never existed.

does anybody remember these wonderful Makarov "KGB PRESNTATION" pieces?




they are about as real as my mosin-nagant rifle once belonging to stalin



anyway, that is my view. it's a American invention.
 

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Hi. I sort of suspected that the whole "Black Sea Navy Makarov" wouldn't hold up to close scrutiny. Unfortunately the name may stick with collectors. There is a tradition in Russia for special finishes being applied to presentation pieces. I know the N.K.V.D. cavalry units carried swords with nickle plated iron hilts so I suppose it is in the realm of speculation that the chromed Makarovs may represent use by special groups or ranking officers. The problem there is no currently know documentation on them. As with a lot of Makarov information we are forced to work backwards, teasing out information from pieces in hand. That is the fun part but it can also be frustrating. ABTOMAT
 
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