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And just like that in a blink of an eye the victims life has been changed forever.

Next day the food will taste better, and the memory of the incident will be a constant companion.

Add couple hundred other violent or frightening encounters like that to the victims experience, and they will no longer seek out and will actively avoid scary and fearful situations.
 

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While it's easy and certainly feels good to simply wish this boy dead, he didn't end up killing anyone and while certainly he deserves punishment for this crime I hope he learn his lesson and turns his life around. Given his involvement in heavy crime like this at such a young age there's a very good chance he was born and raised into a world that most of us probably couldn't imagine, surrounded by nothing but crime and degeneracy. One of the best men I've ever met was a mechanic who taught me a lot early in my career, he had spent 3 years in prison for theft and drug dealing, when he got out he completely dropped all criminal activity and went on the straight and narrow, working every hour he could. He was raised in the worst neighborhood in the city with no father and a sickly mother that he was taking care of from the age of 16, which is a large part of why he began stealing in order to keep bills paid and his mother medicated. Today he's an excellent mechanic, a wonderful father, and a devoted husband. He warned me many times about the dangers and pitfalls of the world of crime and drugs, though I was already on a path far from those things. I hope this boy ends up with a similar story.
Saturn,
There are two sides to a coin. After retiring from the Army in 1988 as a CW-4, I went to work for the California Department of Correction. After 15 years, I retired as a Correctional Lieutenant with 100% disability (because of an Inmate). I had very few inmates that were rehabilited. I had a lot more that returned over and over. Your mechanic is a 1%'er. I do have respect for what he did.
kaydee
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From Saturn "While it's easy and certainly feels good to simply wish this boy dead, he didn't end up killing anyone and while certainly he deserves punishment for this crime I hope he learn his lesson and turns his life around."
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.
He didn't end up killing anyone because he got shot by intended victim !
He certainly had the means and wherewithal to kill or maim someone !
Hope he learned his lesson?
Very doubtful. Most likely he will learn other lessons of an evil nature when he goes to prison for a short time.
 

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Saturn,
There are two sides to a coin. After retiring from the Army in 1988 as a CW-4, I went to work for the California Department of Correction. After 15 years, I retired as a Correctional Lieutenant with 100% disability (because of an Inmate). I had very few inmates that were rehabilited. I had a lot more that returned over and over. Your mechanic is a 1%'er. I do have respect for what he did.
kaydee
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I am legitimately curious, do you feel that it may be more effective to focus more on teaching inmates valuable skills and trying to persuade them that a fulfilling and responsible life is an attainable goal, or should we simply focus more on pure punishment? To me it seems that simply locking someone in a hole with other terrible people and letting them fight it out isn't going to induce the change that we're looking for in the lives of these men, many of whom never knew any other way, but I don't have the first hand experience that you do.
 

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You tell a wonderful story and many young criminals with time may stop after a long career of being criminals. But while they are still criminals the public must treat them as criminals, especially those committing armed robberies. It is the lives of the innocent that are sacred and not those of evil doers.
I agree, and of course some punishment must be in order, what I take issue with is everyone here wishing he was just dead, when he's still a very young person, not even a man yet, and still has potential for his life if he's shown a better path, whereas simply condemning him now as a life long criminal and beating and punishing him with no option for improvement will only fulfill that prophecy. Yes he should be off the streets for sure, but simply saying we wish he's dead isn't going to fix anything.
 

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I agree, and of course some punishment must be in order, what I take issue with is everyone here wishing he was just dead, when he's still a very young person, not even a man yet, and still has potential for his life if he's shown a better path, whereas simply condemning him now as a life long criminal and beating and punishing him with no option for improvement will only fulfill that prophecy. Yes he should be off the streets for sure, but simply saying we wish he's dead isn't going to fix anything.
Study of crime and criminals (and significant contact with both over nearly 30 years) suggests that your attitude is very Christian and it would be real nice if the world worked the way you want it to. But the fact is - that isn't the way the world works. This 17-year old criminal (and an ADULT for the purposes of Texas criminal law - the only slack he gets now that he has had his 17th birthday is can't get life without parole or the death penalty) will almost certainly NOT reform or stop committing offenses. Except while he i confined, and likely not then. Did you notice the number of offenses he has apparently committed just this year? And that he cut hi ankle monitor off (supplied as a term of bail) to facilitate this offense?

Me, i don't WISH him dead - but I do think it is a pity that he wasn't shot to death while committing a felony while armed. He is, like a vicious dog running at large, too dangerous to others for that to continue.
 

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I agree, and of course some punishment must be in order, what I take issue with is everyone here wishing he was just dead, when he's still a very young person, not even a man yet, and still has potential for his life if he's shown a better path, whereas simply condemning him now as a life long criminal and beating and punishing him with no option for improvement will only fulfill that prophecy. Yes he should be off the streets for sure, but simply saying we wish he's dead isn't going to fix anything.
If you put things on a balance of what is better for society, him being removed makes the side for good weigh a lot heavier for the positive.
 

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While it's easy and certainly feels good to simply wish this boy dead, he didn't end up killing anyone and while certainly he deserves punishment for this crime I hope he learn his lesson and turns his life around.
I wish no one dead. However, this person has demonstrated more than enough predatory and violent behavior to determine that society is better off without him. I care far more about his victims than I do his hard luck story.
 

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I wish no one dead. However, this person has demonstrated more than enough predatory and violent behavior to determine that society is better off without him. I care far more about his victims than I do his hard luck story.
Ok, so right now the guy is back off the streets, in your opinion should we kill him or make some attempt to rehabilitate him through education or punishment? And if you believe he should die, would you do it yourself?
 

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Ok, so right now the guy is back off the streets, in your opinion should we kill him or make some attempt to rehabilitate him through education or punishment? And if you believe he should die, would you do it yourself?
You must have missed the part where I said “I wish no one dead.” However, if he attempted to rob me, I would definitely do it myself.
 

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Why should any potential killer get cut any slack. It’s one thing to purse snatch, b&e, trespass or commit strong arm robbery but when you point a lethal weapon at someone in order to steal their property, attempt to kill, to kidnap or to rape them you deserve to be put down. Either right then by the victim or by a swat sharpshooter or a year later after the trial. You are stating by that evil action that the victims life is meaningless to you. The reason that shootings are happening at the rate they are in America is simple, there are no consequences any longer.
 

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i carry legaly and will not think about shooting any one for a second that puts my loved ones or my self in deadly danger. there are enough killings that take place after the victim gives up his-her valuable's for me to worry about the life of a low life scum bag.
 

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You mean as in removing him to put him in prison for a time or as in issuing death sentences for armed robbery?
What is the cost of The Extent and Costs of Crime Victimization: I could not find and easy answer but it is a lot and stopping is better than do nothing choice.
So what can do that is better for society is him costing society as little as possible in resources.
Put them in prison
To kept them in prison for a year and figure $20,000 x 30 years = $600,000
StatePrison populationAverage cost per inmate
Florida100,567$19,069
Georgia46,145$19,977
Hawaii6,063$29,425
Idaho8,120$22,182

A capital murder trial
In its review of death penalty expenses, the State of Kansas concluded that capital cases are 70% more expensive than comparable non-death penalty cases. The study counted death penalty case costs through to execution and found that the median death penalty case costs $1.26 million
If a citizen or cop kills them, it is the cheapest overall cost to society.
 
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