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I think you did pretty well for your first centerfire rifle using surplus ammo. Practice makes perfect. I believe you will get even better when you become familiar with your new rifle.
 

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Try using larger targets !! That's not a joke; if you have trouble seeing the target, you are not going to hit it. That's why even standard 50 yd. targets are so big. I have trouble with colored targets at any range with iron sights; the targets just seem to fade after a couple of shots. A big black target is best. As long as you use the same aiming point, your groups will be good (all other things considered).

Frank
 

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How old are you and your eyes?

What eye is your dominant one? (If the one with the astigmatism and/or the left and you shoot right handed, this may be part of the problem.)

Do you "throw right/bat left"? (I do--and am left eye dominant.)

There are things and tricks that you might consider to help. Over the past couples years, my shooting visual acuity has gone downhill, although I can see like an eagle through my contacts, and have recently had the Rx checked for far vision. It's the combination of getting a sharp view of front and rear iron sights and the bullseye that is a problem (and a perfect eye can't focus sharply on all three at once).

Suggest a larger, standard black bullseye target that you can take a six o'clock hold on and let it go a bit fuzzy, while you work on sharper focus for front and rear sights.

Here's one thing that can help:


available at:
http://www.championshooters.com/
 

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It's the return of the bionic eye! Shyquestor, do you use this device/does it make a big difference? Denny
 

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It's the return of the bionic eye! Shyquestor, do you use this device/does it make a big difference? Denny
I do and it helps. The apeture is variable and it slides across the frame to help with eye position relative to cheek weld. It will help sharpen up the distant target in relation to the shorter focus between the front and rear sights. Not cheap..about $75. There is a cheaper "Merit" apeture that uses a suction cup..tried it and went to this instead.

Lately, I have been wearing a pair of dime store reader glasses over top of the safety glasses.

I am going to get my ophthalmologist to work with me to get a prescribed shooting glasses solution, but need to be able to get him out to the range with some of his tools so I can see the effects under a live fire and real distance situation.
 

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Good advice so far. You mentioned something that caught my eye. "I just couldn't see the green dot any longer. The white piece of 4x4" paper became my focal point". If you are precision shooting, especially with iron sights, your focus should always be on the front sight and not the target. Yes it makes the target blurry, but it doesn't matter, it should be. The other problem is that you are using a short military gun with, I'm guessing, a real heavy trigger and surplus ammo. The fact that you can hit a 4 X 4 target with that gun tells me you're shooting ability is probably a little better than you think it is. You may also be anticipating the recoil and moving as the shot is tapped off. Try calling your shots. Focus on the front sight during your entire shot process until after the gun goes bang. It's natural to want to focus on the target and not the sight. Don't. Since you were completely focused on the front sight when the round went down range, what did the front sight do? Did it move up, down, left, right? You should be able to call where the shot went by watching the sight. For example, if the sight went down to the left (assuming you're right handed), then you know you're crushing the trigger and can make the adjustment. Also, use your specs if you can in order to make the sights crisp. Place a piece of that blurry scotch tape over your non shooting lens so your non dominant eye can't see the sights but you're eyes are getting an equal amount of light. You don't want your pupils do dilate so don't use anything dark covering your glasses. The apeture that Shyquestor suggested is fine though because you're looking through it, not at it...and it's adjustable. Shoot with both eyes open. There are a quite a few other tips, but give it a try and see what happens. My long winded 2 cents worth.
 

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What ammo are you using? That's pretty respectable accuracy for a surplus rifle with surplus ammo if you ask me. I admit 50 yards is close in, but at 100 and even 200 yards you'd still be well within center off mass, which is the idea behind a military rifle.
Here's what young eyes can do at 50...


And at 100...note all the touching in the Mauser target X ring. These are actually difficult to shoot for groups, as it is a single large blob of color with no definition of the X.




 

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Shyquestor, thanks for the input. Interesting project working with the Ophthalmo eye doctor at the range. Franks statement about using bigger targets got me thinking about advice posted this summer by a member who advised using small targets to practice with. His reasoning was aim small, shoot small. Any ideas on this? Denny
 

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Shyquestor, thanks for the input. Interesting project working with the Ophthalmo eye doctor at the range. Franks statement about using bigger targets got me thinking about advice posted this summer by a member who advised using small targets to practice with. His reasoning was aim small, shoot small. Any ideas on this? Denny
You really should use a black bullseye target made for the distance you are shooting with iron sights, particularly if you aspire to shoot vintage matches, as this is what is used.

Here is a good source for well-priced targets. I have had good service from them.
http://www.pistoleer.com/targets/
 

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Good advice so far. You mentioned something that caught my eye. "I just couldn't see the green dot any longer. The white piece of 4x4" paper became my focal point". If you are precision shooting, especially with iron sights, your focus should always be on the front sight and not the target. Yes it makes the target blurry, but it doesn't matter, it should be. The other problem is that you are using a short military gun with, I'm guessing, a real heavy trigger and surplus ammo. The fact that you can hit a 4 X 4 target with that gun tells me you're shooting ability is probably a little better than you think it is. You may also be anticipating the recoil and moving as the shot is tapped off. Try calling your shots. Focus on the front sight during your entire shot process until after the gun goes bang. It's natural to want to focus on the target and not the sight. Don't. Since you were completely focused on the front sight when the round went down range, what did the front sight do? Did it move up, down, left, right? You should be able to call where the shot went by watching the sight. For example, if the sight went down to the left (assuming you're right handed), then you know you're crushing the trigger and can make the adjustment. Also, use your specs if you can in order to make the sights crisp. Place a piece of that blurry scotch tape over your non shooting lens so your non dominant eye can't see the sights but you're eyes are getting an equal amount of light. You don't want your pupils do dilate so don't use anything dark covering your glasses. The apeture that Shyquestor suggested is fine though because you're looking through it, not at it...and it's adjustable. Shoot with both eyes open. There are a quite a few other tips, but give it a try and see what happens. My long winded 2 cents worth.
Good advice.

And let's all remember BRASS...Breath, Relax, Aim and Slowly Squeeze...with a good follow-through by not moving after firing.

And make sure the action screws have not gotten loose after the first few rounds...and that the barrel has not gotten too hot if many rounds have been fired. (Check to make sure your sight setting hasn't moved?)

And that not all ammo shoots the same--heavy ball should shoot higher at 100 than light ball. And even different flavors of same bullet weight will vary.

And that, as applicable, bayonet on/out or not will make a big difference in POA/POI results.

Keep a book and take notes each time of conditions, ammo, rifle used and results! Refer back to it.

If shooting off the bench, notice how you keep your feet positioned, and keep them the same way next time. Same with how your hold is..rest or just you and elbows.

That's about all I know. ;)
 
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