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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here I hope is a nice piece to add to my small but growing arisaka collection. I collect mausers with some knowledge in the Mosin field--but really dont have a good handle on the arisaka collecting--but I "think" I am getting there with the help of Military rifles of Japan book.


Here is a T44 that I have that has a interesting history to it. As far as details of the gun, it obviously has had a coat of "something" put on it--


As far as the plate, it's what I would call period correct engraving. It has it's obvious flaws one would expect from 50 year old engraving.

The gun's bluing is outstanding, with the only misnumbered/wrong part is the bolt(mismatched number plus it is swept down). Although the bolt looks "original" to something, the bluing does match in wear and appearance to the rest of the gun.

Yes, the dust cover does match although the bolt does'nt...Bore is mirror bright.

Nagoya arsenal series 2 with serial #109xx

I do have some feedback from a gentleman that was on the USS Euryale when this gun was presented to Barney J. Pittari--as well as a picture of Barney J. Pittari from New York City.

Neat piece of WWII history without a doubt!....

Any more additional comments..I would like to hear them..

I know my camara skills are lacking (as well as my camara) but hopefully the pic's will help with my above discription...

BAF
 

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Nice looking carbine with a cool plate! Unless it is aluminum or coated with something (or was polished recently), the metal finish on that plaque looks pretty fresh? Did you have to pay a premium for it?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Nice looking carbine with a cool plate! Unless it is aluminum or coated with something (or was polished recently), the metal finish on that plaque looks pretty fresh? Did you have to pay a premium for it?
In the photo's the plate looks newly polished--which it is not. It actually has a nice patina to it that only a few decades of normal wear will produce. It looks like it was originally a highly polished piece of metal--then engraved to produce the final product years ago.

As far as a premium...yeaaa, probably more then I should have, but I really don't remember seeing many of these presentation pieces floating around on the open market either.

I did do my fair share of investigating to confirm the plate as being authentic---and as far as I can tell, it's correct and was presented at the time of departure when Barney was transferred back to the states after his tour of duty.


Interesting piece that I hope everyone enjoys it, for what it is....


BAF
 

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Many rifles and carbines were personally marked by individuals or unit personnel. Some vets had their souviners customed in Japanese gun shops just after the war. This could be an example. The obvious big fear is that this or others are current counterfeits. I have accumulated a lot of T-44 serials numbers. If you send me this carbine's serial via e-mail I can check it against that list. If it was previously reported wihtout these "after market features" you can bet its a fake. No guarantee if it has not been reported of course. It sounds like you did your research on this one.

Most collectors want a carbine without these alterations. A carbine from the short 2nd Series, which only had approx. 11,200 examples in it, would be prized in unaltered condition.

Frank
 

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The stock, besides having a coating applied also looks sanded as evidenced by rounded finger holds/loss of sharp edges.
 

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Interesting indeed! It caught my interest b/c I visited Sasebo Naval Base a couple of times when I was recently stationed in Japan. I thought the plate was confusing because 5th Fleet today is located in Bahrain and also, I didn't think Sasebo was a US sub base back just after the war. Did some reading (I'm USAF, not USN! haha) and found out that back then, 5th Fleet, as part of the larger Pacific Fleet, was a part of all major operations, from the Philippines, Marianas, Iwo Jima, to Okinawa. It was decommissioned in 1947 (until it was stood back up in the Middle East AOR in the 90's). Did a little more research and found out after the war, the USS Euryale was tasked to help decommission IJN subs around 1945-6. According to the ship's official website, she was stationed out of at Sasebo from Sep 1945 to Jan 46. That must've been when Mr. Pittari was part of her compliment.
I also found 2 photos: one of the Euryale itself docked at Sasebo, and the other of Mr. Pittari (2nd from left). Both found on the ship's website, http://www.katiebuglove.com/euryaleindex.html
Nice piece in great shape! I've left a lot of bases in my career and I never got an engraved rifle out of any of them! ;o)
 

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Verty very neat rifle..and excellent work on researching it ,Kotkinjs, way to step up dude!!! wonder if theres anychance that Mr.pittari is still with us, to possibly give any input.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Interesting indeed! It caught my interest b/c I visited Sasebo Naval Base a couple of times when I was recently stationed in Japan. I thought the plate was confusing because 5th Fleet today is located in Bahrain and also, I didn't think Sasebo was a US sub base back just after the war. Did some reading (I'm USAF, not USN! haha) and found out that back then, 5th Fleet, as part of the larger Pacific Fleet, was a part of all major operations, from the Philippines, Marianas, Iwo Jima, to Okinawa. It was decommissioned in 1947 (until it was stood back up in the Middle East AOR in the 90's). Did a little more research and found out after the war, the USS Euryale was tasked to help decommission IJN subs around 1945-6. According to the ship's official website, she was stationed out of at Sasebo from Sep 1945 to Jan 46. That must've been when Mr. Pittari was part of her compliment.
I also found 2 photos: one of the Euryale itself docked at Sasebo, and the other of Mr. Pittari (2nd from left). Both found on the ship's website, http://www.katiebuglove.com/euryaleindex.html
Nice piece in great shape! I've left a lot of bases in my career and I never got an engraved rifle out of any of them! ;o)

The Katiebuglove is where I got some of my info to help put the pieces of the puzzle together before I purchased it. And as far as Mr. Pittari being alive still--I have not been able to find out where he is/or any other records---

The 2 gentleman that contacted me by e-mail did not know what/where he might be either, both of these gentleman where enlisted at the same time as Mr Pittari--Although one of there accounts of the plake presentation guns where spot on with this rifle for plankowners of the Euyale.

From what I understand, the Euyale was used for japanese sub escort after they where surrendered at the Sasebo base shortly after the war...

Pretty neat piece of history for sure!.....

And just to further the info from a earlier posting--
this serial number has not been recorded before using Francis Allens data previous to the time of me e-mailing it to him directly.



BAF
 
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