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T-99 front sight removal?


Topic:



Topic author: JWMWITZ
Subject: T-99 front sight removal?
Posted on: 03/26/2005 2:43:22 PM
Message:
I am restoring a bubbed/damaged Type 99 and need to remove the front sight in order to remove the rear site base which is ruined. This is a 33rd series Type 99 with the late style front site (without site guards). How does one go about removing the front site?

Also, has anyone come up with a good stain mix to match the deep red Type 99 color found on Toyo Kogyo stocks? I've tried Sonoma red but it appears too light.

John in Charlotte, NC



Replies:

Reply author: 03man
Replied on: 03/26/2005 4:47:52 PM
Message:
Good luck John, my success rate is 50% on removing front sights, ie. half are destroyed in the process. If you can see the pin, drive from right to left. Soak in oil, use a little propane heat to help loosen it up before you start. They were blued after installation, which left some of the blueing salts in the joints and are a little "corroded" on. If you can't see the outline of the pin, you will have to grind a little to make it show up and so you will know where to pound. Use a large flat punch and a heavy hammer, it takes a lot of force to move the pin. Pin will be distorted when it comes out, you will probably need to make a new one.

I find it almost impossible to get enough stain into a stock. I guess too much of the old finish is sealing the wood. I believe the original finish also had color in it, kind of like a color varnish. I bought some "merlot" stain at Lowes, its about as red as you can find, I believe if you get enough of it in the wood it would be ok.

Good luck, don't hit your thumb.

Reply author: JWMWITZ
Replied on: 03/26/2005 7:42:50 PM
Message:
Thanks 03,


I ended up drilling the pin out as the punch technique was not moving the pin. I punched the pin out easily after drilling.

John

Reply author: 03man
Replied on: 03/26/2005 9:46:13 PM
Message:
Sounds like the smart way. I think the pins are peened on each side, making them nearly impossible to drive out, as they are so soft they continue to deform and "tighten" even more.


Reply author: Jap7.7
Replied on: 03/26/2005 10:26:32 PM
Message:
I have had good results with Minwax "Dark Mahogony" stain.


Reply author: rcb
Replied on: 03/26/2005 10:44:36 PM
Message:
The pin is only flared on the right side, on the left it is just a plaing flat headed pin.If you lay the left side of the sight on a solid piece of iron with a 1/4" hole in it and hit the pin on the right side with a 1/8" flat punch it will come out. Then put the sight in a padded vise and twist the rifle and the sight will come off. If you get the punch in the center of the pin the flare will straighten out and you can insert it back place the right side on a solid stell pad and hit the pin and the flare will fill the crevis back out looking almost like it has never been tampered with. I have removed quite a few this way with no problem. The secret is holding the sight completely flat on the steel anvil with the hole in it. It is very difficult to make a tapered pin to go back in the hole and look right. rcb.


Reply author: JWMWITZ
Replied on: 03/27/2005 09:52:30 AM
Message:
Thanks RCB. Should have waited until I read your post. Now I need a new front sight pin. Oops.


John

Reply author: cartoonist
Replied on: 03/27/2005 4:20:27 PM
Message:
The finish is called urushi. It's a Japanese type lacquer that isn't readily available in hardware stores. There are actually two articles on the Banzai website about it. It's not a stain insomuch as a shellac type sealant; therefore you won't be able to apply stain over unless it's worn through to the wood.


The only way to recreate the original finish is to get some urushi and experiment with different degrees of red vermillion pigmentation to recreate the finish. Urushi is still used prevalently by many artists and by woodworkers for an authentic Japanese style finish on everything from chopsticks and bento boxes to jewelry boxes and furniture. I bought some from a supplier in Japan; it came in a tube like toothpaste, and it's supposed to be mixed with turpentine... I just need to get the vermillion, and experiment on an old stock. It is quite hazardous stuff.

Dave

Reply author: rcb
Replied on: 03/27/2005 10:11:46 PM
Message:
JWM, you can chuck a short peice of approperate rod in a drill and us a file and make one. The pin is ,690" long, .154" on the small end and .160" on the big end. rcb.


Reply author: JWMWITZ
Replied on: 03/27/2005 11:52:06 PM
Message:
I will try that, RCB, thanks. In regard to urushi, I have two spray cans of the stuff which I bought in Okinawa. It smells aweful and produces a very glossy finish. Not at all like any Arisaka stock I have seen. But then, the stuff comes in all sorts of colors and glosses. Not sure which one would match, but at the cost ($10 for a small spray can) it would be pretty inhibitive to experiment.


John

Reply author: Stan Zielinski
Replied on: 03/28/2005 1:08:38 PM
Message:
John,


You should have read my article in BANZAI on this issue. For a replacement pin get a #0 taper pin which you should be able to find at any place that supplies machine tool products. As I recall there were 1 or 2 sources listed in the article.


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