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I'm not sure how these odd guns find me. Never seen one like this, and can't find much information. I can say that the band and nosecap were drilled on the stock, and the pin was installed without cleaning up the metal and wood shavings. The drilled hole in the band is not reblued.

Bonus. It's a cut down Carl Gustafs Stad M96 from 1920, a somewhat scarce year. Barrel, receiver and rear sight are original matching font. Stock, bolt and bands are conversion matched (?) in a different font. The handguard is the only part that does not match. Stock measures 39-3/8" from top of buttplate heel to the front of the band.

Couldn't get daylight pics, so I'll show the whole gun tomorrow. It's a very decent specimen.

But here are the guts of the pinned nose parts.




 

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I have not seen one without a typical front spring. This is certainly new to me. I am not an expert but I would say 'bubba' before saying its legit.
More knowledgeable folks will chime in, I am sure.
 

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Here's the rifle. Meh, maybe it's a little nicer than I thought.

Rear sight lacks the T-stamp.



















 

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Looks like a step at the front sight base . Original front sight base on a Swedish Mauser is flush with the barrel , no exceptions . Lack of bluing on the barrel in front of the base does not match the dark bluing on the barrel . Barrel looks a little long in front of the base as well . I agree that Bubba had his hand in it .
 

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Thanks, guys.

Swede, I know that the thread which I linked was from eight years ago, but do you recall ever solving the mystery of where these pinned-band alterations emerged?
 

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Thanks, guys.

Swede, I know that the thread which I linked was from eight years ago, but do you recall ever solving the mystery of where these pinned-band alterations emerged?
Sorry . I do not remember where they came from . Is your cleaning rod bent or going through the stock at an angle ??????? That is not right if your rod is straight .
 

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Fancy beech stock

Too bad Bubba got his hands on it. On the up side, that may be the prettiest beech stock I've ever seen on a Swede.
Here is a Flashy beech stock on a carbine . Unfortunately , Interarms scrubbed the receiver date & import marked it .
 

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Sorry . I do not remember where they came from . Is your cleaning rod bent or going through the stock at an angle ??????? That is not right if your rod is straight .
Cleaning rod is straight when removed from the gun. But there is noticeable 'resistance' just inside the stock behind the nosecap when inserting, placing some upward pressure on it. In other words, it doesn't just freely slide in and out. Seems slightly odd, as the cleaning rod hole should run parallel to the barrel for the entire length, but it obviously doesn't.

Yes, the beech stock is rather attractive. The bore is impeccable. It will likely make for an excellent shooter, if nothing else.

Wonder who made these up? If it was done after import, it might explain the lack of import marks on the portion of the barrel which was cut. Regardless, they did a pretty decent job. Not as nice as arsenal, but certainly passable for utility.
 

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Cleaning rod is straight when removed from the gun. But there i;)s noticeable 'resistance' just inside the stock behind the nosecap when inserting, placing some upward pressure on it. In other words, it doesn't just freely slide in and out. Seems slightly odd, as the cleaning rod hole should run parallel to the barrel for the entire length, but it obviously doesn't.

Yes, the beech stock is rather attractive. The bore is impeccable. It will likely make for an excellent shooter, if nothing else.

Wonder who made these up? If it was done after import, it might explain the lack of import marks on the portion of the barrel which was cut. Regardless, they did a pretty decent job. Not as nice as arsenal, but certainly passable for utility.
One of you Mainers made that one up during one of them cold, long winters ;)
 

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The last photo in the 1st post shows the outside cut on the end of the stock , crudely done with a file , not machined as it should be .
 

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(realizing this is an old thread) just wondering, the nature of this front band work. Was this an attempt to raise the front band so it wouldn't interfere with the top of the barrel? That might explain the removal of the wood from the lower portion of the stock and the upward angle of the cleaning rod. In an attempt to remove any interference with the barrel that would diminish accuracy. just wondering
 

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Hard to say what someone else was thinking ? It is a modified m/96 stock , so CG cut them down to a m/38 length . We do not see inside the barrel channel . Part of the cleaning rod slot had to be filled in for the shorter length . Anything is possible , but way to crude to be done in the arsenal ?
 

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appreciate the response, i agree certainly not arsenal work. possibly just modifying the 96 stock to the short rifle configuration.
 
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