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Discussion Starter #1
Although I have owned a couple of M1888 Commission rifles and one Mannlicher/Schoenaur M1910 take-down carbine, I am relatively ignorant on Mannlichers and have little information in my library. At a recent gunshow a fellow was walking around with a Mannlicher carbine that very closely resembled a Swedish Mauser M1892 trials carbine. It did have the steel sleeve barrel shroud and appeared to be "original" but re-blued. It had an aperture rear sight on the cocking knob and was in 6.5x53mm cal. He said that about 800 were made for the Swedes for trials. I could not separate him from it - I think he was just doing a show and tell tour. Was his info correct and what model is it? There is scant information on the Mannlicher in "Crown Jewels", which is understandable...it is a Mauser-oriented book. Thanks, DDR
 

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http://www.rebooty.com/~dutchman/xm92.html

The 1892 Swedish Trials carbine is 8x58R Danish. Far as I can remember the rifles are, too.
And they don't have a barrel jacket. The cocking piece does not lend itself to mounting a peep sight.

6.5x53R is the Dutch and Romanian caliber for the 1895 rifle models. They didn't have barrel jackets, either, but they are a split bridge Mannlicher action with a protruding 5 rd inline magazine.

Dutchman
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thank you, Dutchman. Well, not the first time that I wished I had a camera with me! :eek:) I won't pretend to know what was original and what was not, but it surely had a vertically adjustable aperture sight mounted on the back end of the cocking piece. It was a clean and sanitary, professional attachment. I have seen commercial M1903's with a rear aperture sight mounted on the receiver that was moved in and out of position when the bolt cycled and my M1910 9.5x57mm had a aperture tang sight that folded and locked into the top of the stock wrist. When unlocked and held upright by spring tension, it too moved in and out of position but by the bolt. Mannlichers had some clever, if delicate, rear sights.

There was no mistaking a Mannlicher action for a Mauser action. It was most definitely a Mannlicher action and had a single column Mannlicher magazine well protruding from the bottom of the stock. Not a M-S rotary magazine or a flush Mauser style. He had seen my Dutch Hembrug (Mannlicher action) rifle on the table and asked if I had any clips to fit his rifle. He only had one. His ammo and the bore did not appear to be 8mm. I have been approximating calibers by looking at muzzles for 50 years and I am confident in my guess. I just wondered if it matched any known type of firearm or was an oddball - even a bubba'd something. I saw what I saw - I just don't know what I saw! :eek:)

And thank you for that link. The Mauser carbine appears to be the same one depicted in Ball's 4th edition and in "Crown Jewels". DDR
 
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