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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. Picked up my first K98. 1941. Stock is a bit rough and I am considering replacing it with a cupped version to better match the year of production (I think..) Totally new to these and know just enough to make trouble.

Appears to be a Russian capture stock. Did all the RCs put the x on the receiver? If so then I guess this just got a stock swap and the gun itself may not be a RC.

Has waffen stamps all over the place.

bolt, stock do not match.

Can’t wait to get her cleaned up and some time spent at the range.
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Agree, so far - only the stock is def from an RC, & a cupped type would be correct. See more on this stock below.
Not all RCs got the "X" receiver stamp treatment, & except for the bolt s/n - this barreled action appears untouched.
Bolt s/n has been viciously defaced (an RC footprint), BUT it still appears to sport the same native "g" suffix as the action does: thus, could you please look for WaA 623 & WaA 77 upon the bottom face of the bolt root?

The depicted stock sports heavy RC footprints, & appears to be native to a Borsigwalde. There should be an internal s/n in the barrel channel, & more markings (WaA 26 & s/n) upon the lower wrist & keel areas. The bayo lug may or may not be marked upon the forward face. Also check for the lumber blank cure date pounded into the aft end (requires removing the buttplate).

Other observations: we see an early-style import mark in pics #11 & #16, bolt shroud & safety have been force-matched (incorrectly @ only 2 digits), & the triggerguard loop appears altered by hammering-out the ring shape.

You did pretty well on this, your first K98k - so welcome to the sickness!
Thanks for posting this interesting new prize & be advised that the correct stock for it will be a bit pricey, but should not be a huge chore to locate.
 
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Here is an SRF post with some more examples. You got a nice RC where Ivan was in a hurry. That rifle must have been in excellent condition and they diid not bother to take it down and mix parts. Do the band numbers also match the receivers serial number? A very nice example let us know if all bolt parts are 75, hence an all matching to itself bolt. What is odd is that on all RCs I have seen, the stock stamped serial number matches the receiver number. Your stock is 5123, yet the rifle receiver & barrel is 7573. I bet the stock was switched out. Very odd. There can be all sorts of variations, but the one thing an RC is that the horizontal stamped stock number always matches. Maybe someone switched stocks for some reason. Most likely the original one stamped 7573 was cracked or refinished, maybe they did not like the cupped butt plate. Look close at the top of the bolt, do you think it was buffed and re-blued to remove a electro written serial number? Classic had a few of these redone at James River. See the last page in the SRF Post, but they (JR) really made the stock more a German blond. It seems very little was done to this RC. Could you show the band serial numbers. I would like to add this fine example to my SRF post. Could we have a photo of the import mark? This is the first example so nice, yet the wrong stock serial number? Also, I never see restamped serial numbers on the bolt found on an RC. And why 75 instead on a matching 73?? Sanchez is correct, that is also odd. Look to see if the blue on all the parts is consistent? Generally the German serial numbers are mixed and lined out, but not restamped on an RC. I will have to look at my Yugo captures. I wonder if this is a Yugo capture action in a Russian capture stock? Since my stroke I cannot remember Yugo marking attributes. I see on mine, only the bolt stem is renumbered to match the receiver serial number and the blue is different on a Yugo less of a dark black. I looked and no Yugo codes on the left side of your rifle, not a Yugo action -forget that idea. Totally not a Yugo action.
A very intriguing specimen. Stock and bolt irregularities, but by who? I see no lock screw & no cleaning rod which is correct.
see Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows - Surplus Rifle Forum - www.surplusrifleforum.org

It is hard to tell from the light in the photos, but I assume you got the RC Black blue?
It appears more this uniform color which is more black, than a German blue:
Gun Wood Firearm Trigger Shotgun
 

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Is that an RC? Looks like a re stocked bring back sporter. Look at the rear sight, the retaining lip has all but been ground off, but it still catches the hand guard.

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Good eye t bird, a sporter action made up to look like an RC to get a bigger cash price. I guess what does the blue on the rifle look like under better light? There are ground marks on the bolt, serial numbers missing. Hence just the word "German" stamped on the top and no post 68 dot matrix import mark on the barrel (early RC) or the receiver (Late RC). I like that idea. Maybe that is a cold blue? This certainly does not look like an RC blue:
Wood Brown Tan Hardwood Metal



Reconinforce would you say this metal is a true photo color of the metal? This is correct?

Brown Tan Metal Iron Bicycle accessory


Or is it bad light. An RC is generally blacker, a deep uniform RC BLACK.


Pull the action out of the wood and see if the lower action is an RC black under the wood or a cold blue, or original German blue? If it is not black its a sporter action in an RC stock . The RC action is black in all parts-every nook and cranny. On some the inside of the barrel was blued. I got a bring back that was put into a VZ 24 stock. Drilled for a sight. I will get some photos of its blue.
 

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Kool. We see components from at least 3 rifles so far, & I missed that hacked-off handguard retaining ring.
Safety has been renumbered. It & the shroud (at least) are subcontractor marked, but please continue disassembly & verify if the firing pin matches them.
Barrelled action bluing on the underside looks to have some luster, so it might be original.
The WaA 26 stock (s/n 925 b) components have managed to somehow stay together, so that's a plus.
We could still use an image of the bolt root WaA - it's on the bottom face, directly opposite from that ground-off s/n.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Was wondering about the bore myself, may make an awesome shooter!
Agreed. Nice to have one with some historical markings but not worry about throwing it in the range back and popping off some rounds. The more correct my rifle the less I end up shooting it haha. Mainly collect the M1s before getting this one.
 

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This is it, thanks.
Lower case "l" is another subcontractor marking (Astrawerke, these bolts are consistenly found w/ the various "e" marked bits) & the lack of a proper WaA may be significant, so we might need Farb, et al to jump-in here. The firing pin may sport an "e" & the same s/n as well (if orginal to this bolt body).

Probably not the areas you need but here are some around that. Hope that helps.

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
This is it, thanks.
Lower case "l" is another subcontractor marking (Astrawerke, these bolts are consistenly found w/ the various "e" marked bits) & the lack of a proper WaA may be significant, so we might need Farb, et al to jump-in here. The firing pin may sport an "e" & the same s/n as well (if orginal to this bolt body).
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