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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys

I'm looking for any suggestions for good books, specifically about ww1 or ww2. I'm looking for more biographical books, less reference/big history.
Stuff I already read or are reading to give you an idea. Storm of Steel, the Adam Makos books (Higher Calling, Spearhead etc), My Helmet for a pillow, One damned island. Till the eyes close. And more.

Also if anyone has any suggestions for books specifically about the winter/continuation wars, initial days of the blitzkrieg in Europe from the non German side.
 

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I'll check some of my memoirs when I'm home but if you like USGI's "If you survive" and "Visions from a foxhole", "Bloody Roads to Germany", and in the Pacific of course "With the old breed", Helmet for my Pillow, Islands of the Damned, and Hell in the Pacific". Hitler's last Witness and The Forgotten Soldier from the Germans, Quartered Safely out here for the British. These are just books that I have read and enjoyed. There are many more I want to read. I would really like to find one in English written by a Japanese soldier. I started two Russian memoirs and they were okay but not books I would strongly recommend as above.

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For the Japanese aviation experience Samurai by Saburo Sakai probably tops the first hand account list. Adolph Galland's The First and the Last is a top tier German counterpart with first hand history too, but there are a number of good German pure first hand aviation books. Wing Leader by Johnnie Johnson is a British counterpart to those, one among scores of literate and moving first-person British aviation accounts.

Rounding out representative top-tier first person aviation classics listed nationality-wise I'll throw in God Is My Copilot.

3760204


Alas I don't have any good Soviet aviation lore to share. There may little or none that is authentic, and their overall story was pretty dismal. But there must have been a few surviving Sturmovik pilots who had tales to tell - and how.
 

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Hoppy,

I'm going to pick up the Iwo Jima book, it sounds right up my alley. Had you read all of the ones I mentioned? I believe you had already listed helmet for my pillow.

I would definitely be interested if someone on here had recommendations for the Invasion of Poland or the Winter/continuation war as you mentioned.

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I had read Helmet for my pillow, and with the old breed is on my list to be read. I will check the rest out.
I had read A Tomb Called Iwo Jima and found it interesting. Theres even a TV program that followed up with one of the Japanese soldiers after the war.

Thanks again


Tempest
I'll be sure to check Gallands book as he's very positively thought of in A Higher Calling, the Adam Makos book mostly about Hans Stigler time in the war.

David

If it's Taffy Three im there!
 

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World War I:
Louis Barthas, translated from the French by Edward M. Straus, Poilu: The World War I Notebooks of Corporal Louis Barthas, Barrelmaker (YUP: 2014)
Gabriel Chevallier, translated from the French by Malcolm Imrie, Fear: A Novel of World War I (NYRB: 2008)
Emilio Lussu, translated from the Italian by Gregory Conti, Soldier on the Southern Front: The Classic Italian Memoir of Word War I (Rizzoli ex libris: 2014

WWII--Japan--New Guinea campaign:
Shigeru Mizuki, Onward to our noble deaths (Kodansha 1973/ Drawn and Quarterly, 2008).

Eastern Front:
Continuation War, 1941-44
Väinö Linna, translated from the Finnish by Liesl Yamaguchi, Unknown Soldiers/ Tuntematon Sotilas (Penguin Classics: 2015).

Eastern Front, Soviet-German War:
Svetlana Alexievich, translated from the Russian by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II (Random House: 2017)
Evgeni Bessonov, translated from the Russian by Bair Irincheev, Tank Rider: Into the Reich with the Red Army (Stackpole: 2003)
Artem Drabkin, translated from the Russian by Stuart Britton, Panzer Killers: Anti-tank Warfare on the Eastern Front (Pen and Sword: 2013)
Artem Drabkin, Alexei Isaev, Christopher Summerville, Barbarossa through Soviet Eyes: The First Twenty-four Hours (Pen and Sword, 2011)
Boris Gorbachevsky, translated from the Russian by Stuart Britton, Through the Maelstrom: A Red Army Soldier's War on the Eastern Front, 1942-1945 (UP of Kansas, 2008)
Vasily Grossman, translated from the Russian by Antony Beevor and Luba Vinogradova, A Writer at War: A Soviet journalist with the Red Army, 1941-1945 (Vintage: 2005)
Sönke Neitzel, Harald Welzer, translated from the German by Simon Chase, Soldaten--on fighting, killing, and dying: The Secret Second World War Tapes of German POWs (Simon and Schuster: 2011)
Nikolai I. Obryn'ba, translated from the Russian by Vladimir Krupnik, Red Partisan: The Memoir of a Soviet Resistance Fighter on the Eastern Front (Potomac Books: 2007)
Yuriy Fedorovich Strekhin, translated from the Russian by Maj. James F. Gebhardt, Commandos from the Sea: Soviet Naval Spetznaz in World War II (Naval Institute Special Warfare Series: 1996)
 

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Blood and Soil : The Memoir of a Third Reich Brandenburger by Sepp de Giampietro is a great read the memoir of what is basically the Wehrmacht equivilant of the special forces they did some pretty unique and daring stuff to be sure. It is a very awesome read
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Tom, I have read all of those you mention. Will suggest SOLDAT! by Knappe; A CHILD OF HITLER; E.B. Potter's NIMITZ; ABC's A SAILOR'S ODYSSEY; repeat the suggestion of QUARTERED SAFE OUT HERE (called the best memoir of the Burma Campaign in print by Sir John Keegan, and i will not disagree); John Eisenhower's multi-volume set on his Father) John Master's BUGLES AND A TIGER and ROAD PAST MANDALAY; there are many, many others that fit your criteria.
 

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Ah yes, Soldat was good too. I have a copy of Bugles a.d a Tiger but haven't read it yet. Sounds like I'm in for a good one! The others I will have to check out. Love getting want lists off of these threads.

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Of all the many military history books I have read, very few were read more than once.

These, I have read two or three times each.

Tragedy at Honda (Took place in between the wars)
Iron Coffins
Japanese Destroyer Captain
Stuka Pilot
Kamikazes, Corsairs, and Picket Ships
Guadalcanal (the one by Frank)
The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors.
 

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...David

If it's Taffy Three im there!
It is. IIRC the same author wrote "Ship of Ghosts" which is a good read but far more depressing; I know what happened to POW's but don't wish to dwell upon it.
If you like historical fiction "South to Java" is about an old four-stacker in the Asiatic Fleet.
 

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At least two books on Operation Mincemeat (The Man who Never Was by Montague and the more recent OPERATION MINCEMEAT by Macintyre) probably ought to be on your list.
 

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Has anyone read this one? Amazon.com: Finland at War: The Winter War 1939-40 (General Military) (9781472806314): Nenye, Vesa: Books Just ordered myself. Trotter's Frozen Hell might be the most available for English readers, but it is bit outdated and contains some strange errors and misconceptions.

Väinö Linna's The Unknown Soldiers (the 2015 translation) is a classic, but remember, it is a fictional story. Stay away from the 1950's version, it generally considered crap.
I've got the Vesa Nenye books for the Winter War and the Continuation War. They are both good.

As for Tuntematon Sotilas do you mean the 1950s translation, or the film adaptation?
 
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