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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been trying my hand at restoring an Austrian m88 bayonet, and I apparently have a lot to learn. The locking button is frozen, and after soaking it for a month in Kroil and beating on it with a rubber mallet it is still stuck tight. Anybody got any other tricks or ideas?

Thanks in advance,
Dave M.
 

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What I do (after thorough soaking in penetrating oil) is to place two broad planks on the floor with a gap inbetween and position the bayonet so the locking piece itself is over the gap and can move freely. Button pointing upwards, then i use a hammer and a piece of hardwood (hold the wood against the metal and pound on the wood with the hammer) and pound the button with that. If I can get the button to move a few milimetres I turn the bayonet around, put oil on the locking piece and hammer it back in. I then turn it around and pound the button again. This sometimes has to be repeated a number of times, but with patience it works. Good luck.
 

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bayonet button stuck

David, How are you? Another bayonet project I see! As explained by " bayonetcollector " the key here are sharp blos rather tha soft ones made by a rubber mallets. I se a similar process at times although I use a heavy brass rod about 1/2 inch in diameter and whack onthat with a medium sized ball peen hammer. Heat will also work but not so hot that it melts any brazing in the pommel area. The orther caveat about using heat is that you will often loose the press stud spring although that can be easily replaced. I have an 1890 Mannicher rifle that I just acquired and would like to find a bayonet for it but so far no luck.
One other thing. If soaking in Kroil hasn't done the trick it is possible that the rust fusion is so bad in that area that even if you do get the button and catch loose some of the basic profile will have rotted away. Just an observation. Just keep soaking and tapping and good luck! Joe
 

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more notes on bayonet restoration

David, I jst realized that id heat is applied you will naturally ruin the grips. The process does work but only if the gris have been removed or already missing. Just in case you do any further restoration and need grip screws and escutcheons or slotted nuts Scott Stonehill of Evans Obsolete Screws makes beautiful copies. Best Regards, Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Don't worry, the grips were replaced with some other kind of wood. the seams around the lock and button look very tight, so it's probably a matter of using the right kind of force. I'll try a hammer. I also have a heat gun that blows either 600 or 1000 degrees, is that good?
 

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bayonet restoration

Or use a brass hammer. These can be found reasonably priced in any good hardware store. I have two, one is two pounds the other is three. Also a plug of lead, such as out of the bottom of a lead pot makes an excellent " anvil " to lay the pommel on. Remember that the hammer blows should not be real heavy and must be directly down on the press stud. the reason for that is that the threaded portion of the press stud is small in comparison to the diameter of the stud button, any angled blows can eventuallu bend the shank or even break it. As it is you are always running the risk of cystalizing the shank with hammering. When the shanks do break I drill out the remaining catch, thread it and install a threaded stem as a replacement. I had to do that on your Mannlicher bayonet. Also if you are having this much trouble with freeing up the catch the button stem may break if you attempt to unscrew it. Remember, tap and soak, tap and soak. Good luck, Joe
 
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