Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
283 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend has recently purchased an all-matching 98k that unfortunately was covered with a thick coat of an unknown finish - perhaps varnish, perhaps linseed oil - really do not know. He would like to strip off this finish but does not know if any of the commercial strippers available will damage the glue in the laminated stock. Pictures have been posted in the Mauser 98k part of the forum. Any help on this would be greatly appreciated.
 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
283 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
try rubbing alcohol
Seems to work on getting the stuff off of metal parts, but does not seem to be working on the wood. This stuff was applied in a very thick coating. Will the stocks de-laminate easily?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,240 Posts
Start with de-natured alcohol and paper towels, wearing protective gloves of course.
If that starts to remove the finish, keep at it until done (which can take hours), followed by Howards feed and wax.
If the de-natured alcohol does not work or works very slowly, switch to acetone and try again.
If it has polyurethane on it use citristrip (hated to type that word) followed by the Howards (which can be applied many times over a period of months).
Under NO circumstances should sandpaper get anywhere near the project.
If stripper is the only way to shift the poly/varnish..use as little as possible and for as short a time as will do the job.
FWIW, most of them were coated with something made before the widespread introduction of poly...but good luck!
 

·
Silver Bullet member
Joined
·
36,340 Posts
The red glue laminated stocks are made from Tegofilm, a phenolic resin impregnated sheet of paper used to glue plywood. It is pretty much waterproof.
The white glue is probably a casein glue, only water resistant. It was mostly used after the original Goldmand AG Tegofilm factory was destroyed by bombing.

Regardless, I would never use a water based stripper unless you apply quickly then remove with steel wool before any water has a chance to penetrate, repeating as much as needed. Do not use acetone as it will damage both glues.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,240 Posts
White glue stocks tend to fall apart without being touched or otherwise influenced by chemicals of any kind, that glue sucked (at least on the timescale from then to now), worked well enough to get to the end of the war..
Red glue stocks are pretty hard to damage if the "restorer" is careful.
I've many times used acetone applied to a paper towel (which is then rubbed on the stock) with no damage done, perhaps because it evaporates very quickly.
Soaking or submerging a stock in acetone would probably do massive harm (but I have not heard of anybody doing it so that's a guess on my part).
Here's a red glue rifle that came to me with a thick layer of varnish which acetone on paper towels did not seem to harm, but I did sell it five years after I removed the varnish so who knows, there may have been a delayed reaction and it crumbled to bits a week after it sold..
And yes, that's Howards Feed-N-Wax on the stock after cleaning, nothing else, but applied quite a few times over months and months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,079 Posts
If I may surmize, that this may be a rifle he is to sell soon? I mean, once he strips the stock, folks can tell it had been freshly cleaned, and not a "as fresh as when grandpa took it off Fritz in ww2", there is no such thing cause the wood darkens with age and none of them have been in a vacuum sealed locker for seventy years staying clean, none of them, I mean, it might be better to let the next owner decide what to do, especially if a layman is trying to value up a supposed bring back k98, I mean, that catchy phrase, "bringback", pretty much is usually used for high dollar value, etc. I don't like to see amateur acts on rifles or pistols just before resale, as a amateur collector myself, I've seen some real stupid mistakes, like cleaning stocks as clean as possible and almost bleached, cold blueing applied to worn blueing edges like a 100% blueing on a vintage collector rifle is even remotely important, and even steel wool I have seen some boneheaded overworking of wood and the blueing, actually I have seen where folks have taken steel wool on wood without ever removing metal, all metal, from the woodwork, then the blueing on those parts or the receiver is all scratched up, right along with a big "all matching bringback k98/t99/vietnam found sks/etc" and wanna vookooo dollars, basically for something as about as good as a recent import after the hack job. I got a couple in my gun cabinets right now, yes, gun cabinets, not the safes, that I bought and received all screwed over.

If the guy is gonna sell it as a high end collector rifle for a high end price, he ought to leave it alone.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,240 Posts
You never know what's under the non-correct finish.
Some finishes can't be removed without altering the original stain/patina, but those that were slathered with 1940's varnish right after the war can be safely cleaned.
Nay-sayers aside, I've done it several times over the last ten years and in almost every case the rifles came out great and nobody would guess they had been "cleaned".
The ones that had polyurethane still looked better after cleaning than they did with the mirror shine crap finish, IMHO.
I snagged a matched number 1945 BNZ full Kreigs from an old timer at a gunshow in SanAntonio a few years back which had a thick layer of amber goop on it and the seller swore he was told in 1945 to apply said goop to seal in dangerous germs left over from the war that may have been lurking in the wood grain.
Was he mis-informed, full of beans, lying his ass off?
I don't/didn't care, under his varnish coating (which came right off with some acetone) was a fantastic walnut stock.
Ask MrFarb how it looks now...he bought it from me, it may be up on his webpage still, latewar.com.
It's the one with the cracked cocking piece (sabotaged by over-hardening the cocking piece, I'm told).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,240 Posts
Not sure rubbing alcohol will do much, at least in terms of removing shellac or shellac based varnishes.
Sure you don't mean de-natured alcohol?
That's how the product "shellac" (as we know it) is made, dry lac flakes are dissolved in denatured alcohol and that is why it can be removed so easily using de-natured.
There were other chemicals used in some formulations (rarely seen) and the de-natured won't remove that stuff at all.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,240 Posts
Hey, I'm always up for a good rubbin!
 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
283 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
update and progress of sort

Well, he has been working on the stock with just his fingernail, and up until now has had pretty good luck. However, he has gotten to where the applied finish is on fairly thick and it is no longer coming off. As you can see, it looks to have been an original finish rifle - oh well. Anyway, I have suggested that he apply a light coat of alcohol and then go back to the finger nail. By the way, the rifle will likely be sold - but only at the estate sale:)
 

Attachments

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
283 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
from the OP description gunsforall its already been bubbaed so its too late to worry about preserving its finish.
Yes sir. Still, he would like to get it back as close as possible but I suspect it will always show the signs of it's trauma.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
This looked like as good a place as any to post my query. I just picked up a matching Brazilian M1908 Mauser off Gunbroker. I paid $350 plus shipping and FFL fee. Stock had been varnished and rifle re-blued. Don't know if metal work was done as part of arsenal refurb or not (Reciever and Bolt are no longer in the white) - but it looks very nice (crest is sharp, no pitting, etc...) . Had intended to strip the stock and use BLO, trying to put it back to a semblance of original, but upon initial inspection, I'm having second thoughts. Stock was heavily sanded to the point that stock cartouche is nothing but a faint memory, and metal hardware (cross bolts, stock disk) were sanded as well where they were proud of the wood. Any recommendations? Should I just replace the stock with another Brazil M1908 if I can find one - making the rifle non-matching, or should I try to salvage the original stock? Thanks in advance for any comments/suggestions.

 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
283 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
update on stripping 98k stock

Well, pretty well finished - he sent me these photographs the other day. I believe that he put on alcohol - relatively small amounts, let soften a bit, then continued to work by rubbing. Seems to have come out fairly well. He suspects that the finish under the "glop" was original. (If I have goofed up his description of how he finished he will let me know and I will correct). Of course, we still do not know what the stuff was that was put on the stock (and metal).
 

Attachments

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,240 Posts
Looks pretty good!
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top