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Discussion Starter #1
I brought home a very clean Winchester Model 12 yesterday- 1963 vintage, not messed with, field grade 12 gauge. The stock hasn't been messed with at all but has kind of a sticky/grimy feel to it. Any suggestions on what to use to clean it up a bit without hurting the finish? Thanks in advance!
 

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I would try rubbing it down with cheese-cloth soaked with turpentine (REAL steam-distilled gum turps, please).
 

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What the problem is that you really don't know exactly what finish was applied on your stock. Could be anything, tru-oil, GB lin speed, varnish, shellac, or even a laquer type finish. Having said that It also looks like the finish never really cured and now you are stuck with a sticky stock. I'd use either a brush on paint removed or some solvent like acetone. Wear chemically resistant gloves and do your work outside. Hope this helps. Frank
 

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This is a common problem with wood finished in Nitrocellulose Lacquer "The popular finish of the time period" It's caused by a variety of reasons, humidity, cleaning chemicals, etc. That being said you can try cleaning it with Turps or Mineral Spirits,,,NOTHING else. With that said, even if the tackiness goes away BUT you can put an indent into the finish with your finger nail,,it's toast and a refinish is in order.
I've had plenty of stocks, rifle and shotgun through my shop that had the imprint of the rifle case they were stored in permanently imbedded in the Nitro finish. Don't store your old sporting arms in cases or socks!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I appreciate all the input given, thanks everyone! I tried Murphy's on it and it seemed to do the trick. The gun was pretty filthy, covered in petrified oil, gunk and dust and it seems like the stock was equally cruddy. I had the Pledge at the ready as a last resort. Here's a picture of the end result.
 

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I can clearly see your top coat is gone. It was already paper thin when it went soft and cleaning removed the residue leaving most likely bare spots of wood. There may be spots of good top coat left, there may not. If you were to wipe the butt down with a solvent or even handle the piece the butt will appear dull because you'll have removed whatever "oil" Mr. Murphy puts in his product to make kitchen cabinets shine for a while. The same would have happened had you'd used one of the solvents that was recommend, the difference being no misleading shine.
Is it a big deal? No, just laying out what is going on.
 

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Bought a 73 Winchester rifle off an old Feller years ago that hung over his cooking galley/open fire place and it was coated in cooking grime and smoke, a real Ma and Pa Kettle shack, it came up real nice with a couple of applications of Selley's Sugar Soap.
 

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Cheese cloth or blue gene materials turpentine soaked.
Use back forth motions in shoeshining motion,
Use even pressure, polishing while removing the excess sallec or I dried linseed oil added that absorbed moisture and not drying properly during bad atmospheric conditions.
As Clyde suggested so correctly!><> Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The amount of knowledge around the forums is phenomenal- thank you all for the information, I've learned a lot!
 
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