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I recently purchased this M90 from another Gunboards member who owned it for ten years. From what I have read approximately 10,000 Steyr M90's were furnished to Bulgaria. Nick, Do you have any better figures on the M90's furnished to Bulgaria? I have been told they are scarce in the US.The receiver, barrel and stock(another number present) are matching. The bolt is unnumbered as it should be. The is an S on the barrel shank(converted to 8X56Rmm). There is a Bulgarian Lion on the Barrel Shank, right side receiver and right side of the barrel.

All pictures can be seen at:

http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/album/577659544XUuWnp
 

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From what I have read approximately 10,000 Steyr M90's were furnished to Bulgaria. Nick, Do you have any better figures on the M90's furnished to Bulgaria?
My sources only show a contract for 6,000 M.90 carbines placed in 1892.

Another source states that as of September, 1912 Bulgarian army had "9,518 Mannlicher carbines". This number includes 2,000 M.95 carbines from the Steyr 1904 contract, therefore the total number of M.90 carbines is around 6,000-7,000.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My sources only show a contract for 6,000 M.90 carbines placed in 1892.

Another source states that as of September, 1912 Bulgarian army had "9,518 Mannlicher carbines". This number includes 2,000 M.95 carbines from the Steyr 1904 contract, therefore the total number of M.90 carbines is around 6,000-7,000.
Thanks for that information. Is anyone aware of another M90 Bulgarian Contract Carbine in US?
 

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I've seen Bulgarian-marked M.90 carbines only in Bulgaria. Nice find!

Here is a scan from one of the sources I had handy. It shows the small arms inventory as of Sept. 1, 1912. Item 3 is "Mannlicher carbines" and the quantity is 9,256. The next column shows ammo total of 186,979,356 rounds for all Mannlichers and Schwarzlose MG's.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've seen Bulgarian-marked M.90 carbines only in Bulgaria. Nice find!

Here is a scan from one of the sources I had handy. It shows the small arms inventory as of Sept. 1, 1912. Item 3 is "Mannlicher carbines" and the quantity is 9,256. The next column shows ammo total of 186,979,356 rounds for all Mannlichers and Schwarzlose MG's.


Thanks, I feel very fortunate to have acquired it from a Good Friend.
 

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Nick, that's an interesting graph. 269709 Mannlicher rifles, 51528 Berdans/Dragoons, 12925 Krinkovs, plus 1508 S&W revolvers and 4450 Lugers. Can't figure out what are the 232 Kartechnitsi - what are they?
 

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Can't figure out what are the 232 Kartechnitsi - what are they?
Kartechnitsa = Machine Gun. All were Schwarzlose 1907 at that time.
 

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M.90 carbines in the hands of Bulgarian (Macedonian) rebels during the Ilinden Rebellion of 1903. They were supplied by the Bulgarian army and the rebels were trained by Bulgarian officers and NCO's.





And some long ones, M.88 & M.95:

 

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I love the guy on the bottom right. He's holding his carbine and a grenade! LOL
 

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I love the guy on the bottom right. He's holding his carbine and a grenade! LOL
it looks like most of them held something they liked in their other hand... I understand the gernade and pistols, but why are those other guys just holding binoculars instead of the pistols in their belts? pistols are much more manly
 

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Hmm.... I thought you may notice something unusual on the last picture...

The guy on the right (first row, sitting) is holding a M.95 carbine. And this carbine has a bayonet lug! This picture is taken way before WWI, when according to Heino Hintermeier the "oberem Stutzenring" was introduced. Now we see it on a picture from 1903!
 

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I've seen Bulgarian-marked M.90 carbines only in Bulgaria. Nice find!

Here is a scan from one of the sources I had handy. It shows the small arms inventory as of Sept. 1, 1912. Item 3 is "Mannlicher carbines" and the quantity is 9,256. The next column shows ammo total of 186,979,356 rounds for all Mannlichers and Schwarzlose MG's.


Don`t forget my Dear Nick,that here -in the Col.Kraptchansky`s book ,the number of Mannlicher carbines(9,256), is the common number of all Carbines ordered till sept.1912...That means -6000 carbines M1890(for artyllery,Cavalery and engeneer units-ordered in 1892 from Steyr),2000 carbines M1895 - from Steyr in 1903, some Carbines-412 ,a.k.a. "VMORO order" in 1896 and 1899-03....
But still ,from 8500 till 9256 we don`t have the exact information ....(But I have decided to proceed with my investigation)
Kartechnitsa = Machine Gun. All were Schwarzlose 1907 at that time.
No, All the Machine guns were Maxim-Nordenfeld MG04 and Maxim-Spandau MG08....some historians sayd 232, some -248(till the start of 1-st Balkan War,couse there ,we have captured some turkish MG08) .Our MG04 were equiped with the first pattern-Schlitten 01 or so cold "the Sleigh"-Carriage.And the other half was equipped with tripod/shield-carriage "M1909"....At this time ,we have only 1 Schwarzlose MG,which was bought only for tests(First Schwarzlose 7/12 MG started to appear officialy in our army in 1915-16)

(for more clear understanding I used the Western signature for MGs...I suppose that here all members knew that in our army docs, the Signature of some weapons is not the same like the western.Here we name the weapons according with year of addoption ,or in some cases --according with year in which the Contract/order was signed)


Respects:
Memo
 

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it looks like most of them held something they liked in their other hand... I understand the gernade and pistols, but why are those other guys just holding binoculars instead of the pistols in their belts? pistols are much more manly

In the VMORO(Interior Macedonian-Odrin Revolutionary Organisation)`s secret language -that thing, That the guys are holding Binoculars instead of the pistols or bayo`s ---means:

"We are watching you any minute & any hour, so be a good boy,pay your organisation taxes ,and don`t forget to give some moneys for weaponry .....":)))

Respects :
Memo)

;-)
 

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Hmm.... I thought you may notice something unusual on the last picture...

The guy on the right (first row, sitting) is holding a M.95 carbine. And this carbine has a bayonet lug! This picture is taken way before WWI, when according to Heino Hintermeier the "oberem Stutzenring" was introduced. Now we see it on a picture from 1903!
I noticed the M.95 carbine and bayonet lug, but it didn't connect! lol
 

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...All the Machine guns were Maxim-Nordenfeld MG04 and Maxim-Spandau MG08....
Lapsus calami, I was thinking 1915. Here is a better inventory, where the machine guns are listed as Maxim-Spandau 08:
 

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Reason it didn't connect for me cause I didn't know the year of the photo.
 

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Is the photo dated 1903? There are confirmed original matching examples dated as late as 1912 and 1914 that are original carbines with the early style front band.
 

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I was told the picture was taken shortly before or during the Ilinden rebellion of 1903... but I have my doubts as well. Could be from a later period, the Balkan Wars, when these "Macedonian" bands fought together with the Bulgarian army.

Here is another "cheta" (band) armed with M.95 Stutzens:



And here is another with both Stutzen & Karabiner:



And here is another one from the same rebellion that clearly shows a Karabiner with a stacking rod! :) Well, this one was a joke - the picture is obviously from WWI judging by the Stielhandgranate M1916... Some pictures were apparently incorrectly dated, this one being one of them. I am not so sure about the first one, though.



Pictures are from the site "Lost Bulgaria" http://www.lostbulgaria.com

The picture with the "modern" Karabiner is here: http://www.lostbulgaria.com/?cat=1&paged=18 Note the decade, 1900-1910. The Ilinden Rebellion falls in this period.
 

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He's cocked and locked too!
 
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