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This has got to be a Survival topic.

I drift in and out of Large Construction. The type of projects that OSHA and your state regulators are all over.

A couple years ago I was shocked (Shocked!) to learn that a company wasn't requiring steel toed boots on a job site. The argument was that a falling object hitting the steel guard in the boot could cause your toes to be clipped off. So wearing them was the choice of the worker.

Well, if it could clip your toes with that protection what would it do without?

What do you people think? I will stand 100% behind steel toed boots no matter what the reply - so that's my offer on the subject.
 

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I like them too when needed (not a lot that I have needed them, but have worn them). There was a mythbusters on the steel boot shoes if I remember right?

The story / myth is that if the toe gets crushed in, it stays put, thus bad :)

I have always felt that most of the time the heavy item won't crush metal enough to make me not wear them (if I wore them)
 

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it always been my understanding that steeltoe are for light objects. your hardhat will protect you from a falling hammer but not a 55 gal. drum of water. saw an I-beam fall on a guys foot once. not a pretty sight. his steeltoe boots were not effective in that case.
I am also a boot on the job fan when ever heavy objects are involved.
 

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don't they offer toes protectors not of steel?
 

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There are some Kevlar laminate protectors on the market that have promise but are not certified by MSHA as yet.
 

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thanks thats it!
 

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A lot of folks wear steel toed boots as a self defense weapon, a different kind of protection........
 

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I wore steel toe boots for more than 35 years working in a paper mill and I can tell you that a forklift of regular size rolled over a workmates' toe without narry a problem, other than my mates' expression of disbelief at what had just transpired and I think he dropped a little load in his shorts! LOL. They are really tough but if the boot gets worn down in the toe area the steel cap can wander and if struck hard from the front can in fact dig into the wearers' upper foot, I have seen it happen. Another thing about these boots is that in the very cold winter the caps get so cold your toes can get frosbitten, even with heavy socks. Bottom line is...use common sense, keep the boots in good shape and you will be just fine. One other addition, these boots come with a steel plate sole protector that impedes things like nails or other sharp objects from puncturing the foot and the soles have nice big lug grips for all-weather traction.
 

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Good thread. I just remembered wearing 6" steel toe boots while working in 3rd shop at Ft. Bragg. Since the boots were only 6" they could not be bloused. Guys started wearing their combat boots un bloused, 1st Shirt had a fit and all steel toe boots had to be painted white on the cap. Formation was funny looking with all those white toed boots.
 

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OSHA requires them for certain types or work. But OSHA's rules can be overridden by the safety regulations of the Contractor/Construction Management company. If they say steel-toed - you wear them regardless of OSHA. Likewise. if the say soft-toed - you wear them regardless of OSHA. Many construction management companies are shying away from steel for some of the reasons already posted. Many are requiring hard-toed, but not steel-toed, footwear. As a licensed electrician OHSA specifically states we are not to wear steel due to shock hazard. However, some jobsites still require them. I, personally, don't wear either type - I can't find any the fit my feet without causing irritation. Yeah, someday I'll probably get kicked off a jobsite for it, but, oh well!
 

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I watched a squadron mate get "rolled over" by the nose wheels of an EA-6B with steel toes (uber Navy flight deck mandatory stuff) back in the `80 s with little damage to his person.

I watched a guy get his toes crunched by the center truck of a DC10-30 wearing steel toes.
Not pretty. He`s never running again, I assure you.

It`s all relative people...
 

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Well, they are colorful! However, most construction jobsites don't allow athletic-type shoes regardless of whether they have steel-toes or not. All shoes on site have to be leather.
 

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You need to click on the tab for men's shoes, then click on work shoes or boots. They have some good looking boots that meet all safety requirements with or without steel toes. I didn't notice metatarsal protection but it's probably in there somewhere.
 

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mythbusters busted the steel toes cutting off toes myth. Turns out steel toed boots are much much safer then standard boots
 

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The only problem can be fit...
If you have callouses, bunions, or odd shaped toes, finding a steel toe that fits without rubbing and irritating can be tough. As they can never soften up or stretch out, you have to oversize width which may make a sloppy fit for the rest of your foot.
I wear one brand that fits my toes but does not have the more comfortable insole padding and tends to be a bit sloppy one size too large.
I have a very nice pair in the closet, with a great cushioned insole, but the toe fit is too tight and rubs and irritates.
You can spread them a little by beating them down hard with a large rubber mallet, which will push the sides out a bit but, go too far to where they hit the tops of your toes and you have ruined them beyond repair.

It's not the toes I'm worried about. Odds of dropping a heavy object on the toe are slim. It is the high uppers and ankle support of a high top boot, securely laced, that has saved me from a nasty ankle fracture many times over. Stepping in a hole or tripping over something in the dark (working night shift) is always a hazard. Seen/treated way too many tib/fib ankle fractures with a dangling foot and bones poking out at the ankle. Ain't pretty!
 

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I agree completely with db. My solution is I buy non-steel-toed boots that LOOK like steel-toed boots. And If someone tries the old magnet-on-the-toe trick, I say they're hard-toe. Most boots built this way have a VERY firm leather toe and won't crush if they try to step on them to check.
 
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