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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased one of the Star model B pistols from Aim and it arrived today. I broke it down and cleaned it and have to say that it a nice pistol. I'm questioning the operation of the safety though. The thumb safety engages with the hammer cocked as well as with the hammer down. It seems much smoother with the hammer down and is a bit gritty with the hammer cocked. You can also drop the hammer to a half-cocked position. The thumb safety engages in that position too. Does this seem to be functioning normally? I'm also looking for a source of magazines. Any help or info is much appreciated!

Randy
 

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Try pulling your hammer a little past full cock and then put your safety on. Mine do's it to, My gunsmith quoted me $60 years ago to fix it but i just got used to it. There a nice pistol. chester.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. I found another one here in town and compared the function of the two. They both function the same way so I'll take that as a sign.

Randy
 

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akusp,
I bought mine a few years ago and the safety on it functions just like yours, but I have to pull the hammer back a little to engage it cocked.
 

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Other than to lock the slide closed, the safety performs no function at all when applied if the hammer is not fully cocked. It will NOT prevent the hammer, if impacted, from driving the firing pin into the primer of a chambered cartridge if the firing pin is of the positive, not inertial, type.

M
 

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I've just received my Star Model B from AIM, and it had the safety 'problem' as described above; this must be quite common.

What I did to fix it:

First of all, I found that I could remove the thumb safety easily. Just take off the slide assembly, then, with hammer uncocked, rotate the thumb safety clockwise until the thumb shelf is almost vertical. The thumb safety will then pull straight off with no effort. Be careful not to lose the thumb safety plunger and its spring; they'll probably stay right in place, but can fall out if you tip the left side of the pistol down too far.

After removing the thumb safety, I cocked the pistol and looked into the hole in the frame where the safety's pin fits. I could see the 'heel' of the hammer impinging into the area the thumb safety pin uses. I could also see that a little judicious stoning would greatly ease things. I started by stoning the flat on the thumb safety pin, with extra emphasis on that edge which would be on the forward side of the flat. Not much improvement, but maybe a little bit. Didn't hurt anything, anyhow.

I now proceeded to remove the hammer from the frame. To do this, you extract the little thumb safety plunger and its spring; then uncock the hammer to ease pressure on the hammer spring. Then drive out the hammer pin, which also acts as the containment for the thumb safety plunger and spring. Be aware that it is a bitch to replace the hammer in the frame; be ready with a properly fitting slave pin when you try this. I also noticed later, that it might be entirely possible to radius the heel of the hammer without removing it from the pistol, but you'd need a very steady hand.

Using a hard Arkansas stone, I stroked across the sharp point of the heel of the hammer until I thought it might be worth a try. I reinstalled the hammer (what a bitch!) and tried things. Definitely better! I removed the hammer again and did some more stoning; just breaking the angle a little. This time, when I reassembled, it was MUCH better, in fact, now you can see that - when you apply the safety - it actually cams the hammer back a little. Interesting.

To finish up, I looked at the engagement surfaces where the thumb safety and the plunger interact. I polished the tip of the plunger, then I took a pointed abrasive-laden rubber cone tip chucked into my Dremel tool and polished the two detent points on the back side of the thumb safety plate.

Here are some photos. Looking at #2, it might be feasible to put a little masking tape on the frame to protect it, and then try stoning across the heel of the hammer to break the angle. If that works, it would save a pile of cussing when trying to refit the hammer.
 
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