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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Both my Star BMs have stiff safety levers when compared to my Star PD, lubricating with RemOil hasn't remedied the issue, do I require a major tear-down?

Can this problem be solved simply with a green scrubby pad and some oil and what's the best process for disassembly?
 

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It's stiff because the safety is camming back the hammer slightly, as designed. This is to lift the hammer off the sear a few thous so that if the trigger is pulled with the safety on, the sear will correctly re-set. Otherwise, when the safety is switched off, the hammer would fall.

Normal wear of the hammer and sear causes the cocked hammer to rest further forward and sometimes exacerbates this difficulty. Due to manufacturing tolerances the amount of stiffness varies from gun to gun. Lubrication might help some, but the only sure cure is to selectively fit new parts. This is not easy in Stars, and at the end of the day it's best left alone.

The workaround is to draw the hammer back very slightly when applying the safety.

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
MGMike

Thank you for the clarification on the safety. I'm not fond of them to begin with and would prefer pinning it down permanently as Sykes suggested a century ago but won't alter either of the Star BMs.
 

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The safety on the Star directly locks the hammer, and is fundamentally different from the Colt which does not. It's a more secure system, but it requires very precise fitting. On some guns the safety works perfectly and smoothly; on others not so well. I suspect that the problem emanates from a very small mislocation of one or more holes in the frame for the sear, hammer and safety pivots. In days of yore, experienced fitters at the Star factory artfully compensated for this, utilizing parts from the bins that were at the high or low ends of tolerance. In later years this skill was lost, while sears and hammers in particular became very uniform, which tended to limit selective fitting if the frame holes were slightly off. Then there are the guns that fell victim to kitchen table gunsmithing to "slick up the trigger" without a full understanding of the consequences of altering the geometry.

M
 
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