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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey All - a friend of mine is thinning his collection and is giving me first dibs on some rifles. I've always wanted a WWI-WWII era 1903. From my research so far I've determined that it was originally made in 1918, and refurbished at least once at the Raritan Arsenal. It now has a super nice High Standard 2/44 barrell, a Remington bolt and what I think is a Type 18 Field Replacement stock. It also has a capital P in a circle on the pistol grip and and H on the bayonet lug which I understand to mean "hardened". What I cannot figure out is from what time period Raritan refurbished 1903s. If it was before the end of WWII then I'll probably buy it. If there is evidence that this was put together post WWII it may not fit what I'm after at this time. Does anyone have any insight if Raritan would have refurbished this with the above referenced parts before the end of WWII? Let me know if you would like more pics or info on any additonal parts, etc. Thanks!!!!!!
 

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Charlie - Sorry that I can't likely answer your specific questions about Raritan Arsenal. Most of the military facilities capable of overhauling rifles continued to do so until after hostilities ended (or they ran out of rifles). Maybe Rick the Librarian has some more specific info and can impart it to our benefit. Would be helpful to show a photo of any marks on the left side of the buttstock.

My take; this rifle served in both WWI and WWII and was arsenal repaired/rebuilt as a result of that service. It is a double heat treat receiver (no safety concerns with any reasonable load), has a barrel renowned for consistent accuracy, and a typical GI replacement stock. Many Remington bolts were used in late war rebuilds as Rem had a contract to make some parts specifically for rebuilds. While we all lust after 100% original specimens, most look similar to this configuration. The future owner (hopefully you) has absolutely nothing to be ashamed of. Regards.
 

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Charlie - Sorry that I can't likely answer your specific questions about Raritan Arsenal. Most of the military facilities capable of overhauling rifles continued to do so until after hostilities ended (or they ran out of rifles). Maybe Rick the Librarian has some more specific info and can impart it to our benefit. Would be helpful to show a photo of any marks on the left side of the buttstock.

My take; this rifle served in both WWI and WWII and was arsenal repaired/rebuilt as a result of that service. It is a double heat treat receiver (no safety concerns with any reasonable load), has a barrel renowned for consistent accuracy, and a typical GI replacement stock. Many Remington bolts were used in late war rebuilds as Rem had a contract to make some parts specifically for rebuilds. While we all lust after 100% original specimens, most look similar to this configuration. The future owner (hopefully you) has absolutely nothing to be ashamed of. Regards.
+1

and if Rick can't help, and I'm almost sure he can, pop over to jouster and see if you can get a reply from John Beard (not sure if he is on gunboards)


I would bet this is a good shooting rifle, high standard made good barrels,
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the responses guys. I've gone over the stock (without disassembling it) and the only markings on it are RA-P and the stylized circled P on the pistol grip. Nothing else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Upon closer inspection I did find 1 additional marking on the stock in the bayonet lug cut out. It appears to be a 0. Here are more pics.
 

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looks ok, run of the mill rebuild, not a pistol grip stock, but is a scant grip stock, common use during rebuilds.. bolt looks to be a 1903A3 Remington bolt, also common used during rebuild.
check the headspace, and enjoy.
 

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Hope you don't mind if I throw my hat in the ring.

When determining price/value a Lee Enfield collector in New Zealand told me: "You can never pay too much for a collectible firearm, you can only buy it too early." I always liked that quote helps shave the edge off buyers remorse ha!

Always exceptions to every rule of thumb but... I think it works here. Nice piece should be a good shooter thanks for sharing!
 

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Harrison came up with the {Type} thing, it has nothing to do with military discription,..just a scant grip stock would be how it is..
no such thing as Type 1, 2 or 22 for that matter...
 

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I agree with Chuck, and I admit the "types" are one of my pet peeves (as a lot of you know! :) ).

They have no basis in fact, and Mr. Findley, who makes a handsome living stamping fake markings on stocks, knows this. I had to laugh at one time he accused me of being ignorant, based on the fact I mentioned Harrison's book in passing. I pointed out that he uses them as "proof" on his website for his "type" nonsense.

Sorry ...rant off.
 

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my conversation with MR Harrison was, interesting...though a pretty nice guy,.had an Ego, the size of Texas, and when i asked about the [type} thing and the miss information?? his said,
had to make the book easy for dummies to understand..
i put mistakes in the book, so if someone tried to sell me a rifle faked up based on that info, i would be able to tell..
hmmm....
now run along young man, run along...
 

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The stock is an early one made in 1942 by Springfield Armory. It does not appear to have the 1903A3 handguard ring relief. The bolt sleeve also appears to be from an earlier Remington 1903. The recess for the safety ball detent does not run through like on the A3 rifles.

Can you provide more photos of the bolt from around the safety lug?

Mike

M
 
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