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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So tell me about this Springfield Mark 1..SN#1112373..barrel is (S) 2-45 and as you can see, in the white..front sight is Lyman..rear sight is Lyman. Has the full length hand guard..no 03 rear sight. Bolt is Remington, stock is FJA cartouched and walnut. Is this someones homemade version of a match rifle?
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Discussion Starter #5
That is what I thought as well..been on CSP.
 

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Yep - these post-military semi-sporterized M1903s are pretty common. No Mark I was ever made into a NM rifle. Does the barrel have an "S" in a circle? If so, the barrel is a Sedgely, not a Springfield.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
AH..yes, it is an S in a circle! The barrel is in the white..it has been turned. The condition of the bore is very good. Found two broken shell extractors and an extra peep for the rear sight in the butt trap. It will probably be a decent shooter. Thanks for the info on the barrel.
 

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One thing to be concerned about Sedgely barrels...a large number of them were bent post-WWII and sold as scrap, only to be bought and "straightened by less than honest gun dealers.

However, those "good" Sedgely barrels are supposed to be excellent.
 

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The bent barrels were all marked USMC. Never seen a plain S marked barrel that was bent but it is possible. Some ones idea of a match gun is what we have here. Some of the 03 barrels were supplied in the white I have seen HS barrels that were not finsihed. The Parts on this rifle have some value the sight is a $100 item the stock sounds like a decent 03A3 stock. But as a complete rifle it will probably be a great shooter.
 

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I have a put together like that but mine has a 43 Remington 2 groove barrel. Barrell was brand new when I bought it. It was stuck in an 03 stock and fit very poorly. It is a bit ugly to look at. Myself and a friend have both shot MOA groups with this rifle several times using Military match ammo. It is amazing and one of my favorite shooters. I got it for $200 about 15 years ago. One of my smarter moves and I would not take $1000 for it today.
 

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i'll give my 2 cents on the Lyman sights from my experience. I bought this rifle as a sporter, it came with a 57 rear sight. I bought a 48 (S, i think), but the hole spacing was slightly off, so i couldn't mount it. Also, the placement of the holes made it so the base of the 48 sight blocked bolt operation. So, i settled on getting a new production 57 with target knobs. Im still working on the front globe for this rifle...haven't shot it yet since i restocked it and put it back together



DW
 

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Coneten:

The bad news is your rear sight appears to be a No. 57 of recent manufacture, not a No. 48. The good news is, if the person who put the sight on knew what he was doing, you should be able to put a Lyman 48, or a Redfield 70 on it without interfering with the bolt or the clip slot. The hole spacing is the same for all of these (except for very early No. 48's. I can't explain why Nevadany couldn't mount the No. 48 sight whithout actually examining the rifle).

The new Lyman 57 sights are aluminum and not very durable. The spring-loaded quick-release feature for the gallows arm introduces lost motion and the sight will develop backlash after little use. The Lyman 48's are all steel. They have a quick-release feature, but it has a positve lock. You still have backlash in elevation. Every time you change direction on the elevation knob, there will be 1-3 clicks that are "ineffective"; that is, the sight does not move at all, or does not move the expected ammount. You just need to know your particular sight and compensate for the quirks. I used the Lyman 48 in competition for years, including 1000 yards at Camp Perry, and it's a decent sight if you know how to work with it.

In my experience, the Redfield 70 is superior to anything Lyman ever made. It does not have the quick-release feature, and it does not have significant lost motion or backlash.

This is a Poor Man's Match Rifle that I made back in the 60's. The rear sight is a Redfield 70, the front is a Lyman 17A XNA. It will still shoot Master class scored over-the-course.






Resp'y,
Bob S.
 

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I wish i could expain it better myself. the hole spacing was SO close, but couldn't get the second screw to thread (the old & new 57 went right on, no problems). However, even if i did get the 48 mounted, it would have been too far back and you couldn't work the bolt. Oh well, the rifle is far, far from original anyway, so there is no need to be exact.

BobS, do you know if the 57, with target knobs, was ever made with a steel base? I haven't looked for one yet, but every picture i see of the older 57's they have the standard knobs.

I wonder if i can swap the knobs from my newer aluminum 57 to an old steel 57...

DW
 

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DW,

Yes the aluminum sights are a relatively recent "inovation", in the last 10-15 years (?). Prior to that, the Lyman 57 series and 66 series were all steel. Even a steel sight may have some slop due to the spring loaded slide release.

The problem with aluminum sight bases is that the steel screws wear the threads in the relatively soft aluminum with moderate use. If you are not continuously running the sight up to the 600 yard zero from 200 yards, and back down like I was, the aluminum sight may work OK for you. (I should note here that all of the current high quality target sights like Warner and PNW use aluminum bases, but the difference is that the steel adjustment screws are bigger to reduce the contact stresses, and more importantly, they thread into steel bushings that are pressed into the aluminum base.)

I dont know for sure if the new Lyman target knob assemblies will work with the old steel sights or not. I may be able to find a set to try, but don't hold your breath.

Another option to consider is the Williams Fool Proof with target knobs. These are also aluminum and won't stand up to heavy use, either, but they do have a positive slide lock so it does not have the potential slop issue between the slide and the base of the Lyman 57. Until very recently, you needed a small screw driver to operate that slide lock, but they have finally seen the light and produced a thumb screw slide lock. It comes standard with their .22 "target" sights only, but can be ordered separately for any FP or 5D sight. I got several of these from Brownells.

The Williams sights also use the standard 5/8" spacing of the mounting screws, so anything that was D&T'd for a Lyman or Redfield should accept the Williams unless the holes were drilled too far forward or aft on the receiver bridge.

Resp'y,
Bob S.
 
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