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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Bought this 31/Tula at my local Gunshop. What caught my eye was its speckled Beech stock. The entire stock is speckled, even the toe splice is Beech. I have never seen a 91/30 in Beech. I have seen a Polish m44 in Beech.
Anyway, she looks like new, im happy. The only thing bad is the trigger, its as stiff as a board, like pulling on a leaf spring. Are there aftermarket Mosin triggers that are smooth?. Or a way I can fix this problem safely?. Thanks.






 

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I have 1930 Tula M91/30 with a similar speckled beech stock. My Polish M44 is also in a speckled beech stock but this stock has 02 markings on it, indicating a Hungarian origin.
 

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Very nice stock! You could try a 'Huber concepts trigger. I heare they are pretty good
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you. Do you have a link?
 

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Nice find !! As to the trigger pull, try taking the spring/sear out and narrow the spring portion by grinding or filing along the sides; not the flat top or bottom. Take off a little at a time on both sides and then try the pull. Work slowly and keep at it until the pull is more reasonable.

Frank
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok, Thanks Frank.
 

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The first thing I try on a shooter Mosin is to smooth the triggers mating surfaces. With the sear/spring out lay a peice of crokas cloth or 400 grit sand paper on a hone. Hold the sear in hand and polish the back of it where it makes contact with the release on the cocking peice. Do the same with the mating surface on the cocking peice. Sometimes this is all that is required to give a nice trigger. Apply little moly grease in the trigger slot where it rides on the spring and on the sear face. If this does not work then you can resort to shimming grinding and the like. Most of the time polishing keeps them from being such a speckled BEECH.
 

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Nice rifle!

SSCajun posted good info on making the trigger sweeter, and I've done it myself for very good results. However, it won't do anything for the weight of the pull. You'll need to soften the spring's tension some for that. I have yet to try it for mine, but I'm planning on getting a spare spring first, that way I don't have to worry about screwing anything up.
 

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I have used air conditioning duct strap to great sucess in many applications, great trigger shim stock. There are two sizes of holes in the strap , with snips cut a section the width of the spring. Use a dremel to open up the hole a tiny bit so the screw will pass through it . Now, shim between the receiver and spring with one shim.I'll use up to three but always be aware of how much thread remains in the receiver , production variations on Mosin parts vary wildly. Re-assemble and try trigger and always bump test the trigger for safety. With an empty chamber tapp the buttstock against a sand bag in an attempt to release the trigger.
I have done a few this way, I have also bought spare springs ground and done a number of mean, ugly and nasty things to them. If going this route I will always make sure that the release point has a negative rake in relation to the bolt stop. I file an angle away from the bolt stop on the sear that way you dont have flat against flat and there is less resistance. Trigger work is dangerous business, proceed with extreme caution. Test often. As my old Daddy says " a shortener works better than a stretcher".
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well since I have never done this kind of work yet. I might just have to buy a trigger?. I would hate to screw it up. Is there anywhere to look up this process that has step by step picts or diagrams?. Thanks for the complements , this stock is nice.The picts dont do it justice.
 

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Medullary rays

The structures that you are describe as speckled are medullary rays. They are typical for every beech (and indeed one of the distinctive feature of this species; in the other woods, they are much less visible). The reason why this Mosin-Nagant shows them more than most other stocks (as you have correctly observed) is that the beech was quarter sawn here.

Carcano
 

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re. medullary rays

Good info Cacano. Now you get to explain "quarter sawn" to the non- woody types. (smile)

Frank
(forester)
 

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The way to lighten trigger pull is to thin the section of the trigger spring slightly at the taper so that it breaks easier. be careful though you will wreck it if its too much. I have spares if you need one.
 
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