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The 2nd regiment of the 1st South African Infantry Brigade seems possible. Late-ish for a long Lee, but not out of the realm of possibility. Are there any hints anywhere else on the rifle?
 
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The butt plate is from a 1900 BSA MLE Mk.I*. A martial marked arm with factory proofs. No sold out of service marks. No Naval marks. No commercial proof marks or import markings. No foreign Govt acceptance or property markings. All plain Jane with the exception of just this butt plate, which I believe could be original to the rifle, but who knows? The rifle came to me as a very primitive sporter.

I stripped it down to its components. I have found a replacement barrel with a decent bore. I am looking forward to restoring it.

The rifle was found here in Ontario. But being a Mk.I*, it is unlikely it was ever in Canadian service.
 

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Markings may not be far fetched at all. Being a colonial force and possibly consisting of several former volunteer units, it's very likely they were still using 'obsolescent' rifles earlier in the war.
War broke out only 7 years after the initial introduction of the SMLE, and British regulars would have had first dibs on those.
 

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Markings may not be far fetched at all. Being a colonial force and possibly consisting of several former volunteer units, it's very likely they were still using 'obsolescent' rifles earlier in the war.
War broke out only 7 years after the initial introduction of the SMLE, and British regulars would have had first dibs on those.
I think you are correct JB. I have done a bit of research on this, on the Western Front while MLEs were only around in 1914, CLLEs were common (particularly amongst TF units) until the around the early Spring of 1916 although they appear to have essentially disappeared from the Western Front prior to the Somme (Jul 1916). In other theatres however they persisted much longer, there are plenty of images of MLEs at Gallipoli (1915) - I found one record of a unit in the Middle East not exchanging its CLLEs for SMLEs until 1917, and in far flung corners of the war, amongst second line units and home training units their use persisted much longer too.
 
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