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I think somebody here won it. It makes me realise that I really did steal my Rad 124 98/48.
 

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Yes a member here thank goodness!..Cant wait for him to post it.. what an interesting and hard to find rifle...A cupped buttplate with a finger grooved stock?? And whats with the hole in the front site base?

Good score!! congrats : )
 

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German stock, definitely, yes. Started out as a gew 98, didn't it? It was refurbed 1950 or later as proven by the /48 added to the side rail. The Yugos used the nomenclature but did not mark it on the rifles prior to 1950.
Very nice find and he paid for it. But I understand that. I have another rifle to post myself and it was not cheap!
 

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I have found a 98/48 on gunbroker but am not interested in it. It starts at $205.00 The bolt's serial number has been ground off. and it looks to be reworked with a 1.TRZ marking in the stock. PM me if you cant find it and I will give you auction number.
 

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Yes a member here thank goodness!..Cant wait for him to post it.. what an interesting and hard to find rifle...A cupped buttplate with a finger grooved stock?? And whats with the hole in the front site base?

Good score!! congrats : )
I did not notice the finger grooves until you mentioned them. Who made Mauser stocks like that back then?
 

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I dont think anyone made them with cupped buttplates..Czech Fingergrooved full length action stocks could be VZ24 and earlier VZ23

We know they used VZ24 stocks in the M24/52c and also VZ23 stocks for a group of Yugo refurbs I call the "W prefix mystery rifles"...These W prefix rifles are mentioned in Ball's 4th edition but since the printing I've discovered quite a few more details on them..One detail is that the Yugoslavs manufactured/Modified many variations of stocks for them not just the VZ23

At any rate we know they could produce a new stock for the K98 and have produced many "mutt" stocks...

"My Theory of the day"..Based soley on picture 18 where I think I see the hole indicating there was once a front band retaining spring on the other side:

This stock was a VZ24 Captured by the Germans who added the sling slot and bolt takedown to butt and even possibly the cupped buttplate..It was then modified by the Yugoslavs to house the K98 action found in it today..I just dont see the Germans putting a K98 into a VZ stock
 

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Yup good eye..Not a VZ24 then.. so much for that theory : )..

but the G24(t) has a full handguard also?..Theres another thread over to the K98 forum where some of the German mauser guys are commenting also

What a great find!..this is a fun one for sure..(Sorry a bit Yugo obsessive)
 

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This stock was a VZ24 Captured by the Germans who added the sling slot and bolt takedown to butt and even possibly the cupped buttplate..It was then modified by the Yugoslavs to house the K98 action found in it today..I just dont see the Germans putting a K98 into a VZ stock
Vz- K98- both standard length actions, so either way it would be a drop in fit. right? Why wouldn't the Germans fit a K98 into a vz stock. Surely at some point some armorer needed to come up with a complete weapon without a sound stock ready to hand?
 

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I dont mean to beat a dead horse, or to suggest too much without real evidence... but I was comparing pics of the Standard Modell and VZ24... looks to me like the stock from the Standard is a better match... the color is better and, to me, the finger groove length seems a little too short on the VZ...if you use the sight as a guide...

Anyhow, as others have noted, figuring out the stock might mean very little about the rest of the rifle as it may be a Yugo Mixmaster... I dont know if Yugo practices were like the Soviets or not...can anyone chime in for certain about the practice of dissembling and putting parts into piles before reassembly?... it doesnt really matter anyway...

...also wanted to add... I noticed a faint '42' below the crest on the receiver... unfortunately, according to some online sources, all the production facilities working in 1942 had '42' stamped on the receiver...so thats no help... but still interesting.

1942
  • Mauser, Obendorf- "byf" 42
  • J.P. Sauer- "ce" 42
  • Mauser, Borsigwalde- "ar" 42
  • Berlin-Lubecker- "duv" 42
  • Gustloffwerke- "bcd" 42
  • Steyr- "bnz" 42
  • Waffen Werke Brunn, Bystrica- "dou" 42


 

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This stock was a VZ24 Captured by the Germans who added the sling slot and bolt takedown to butt and even possibly the cupped buttplate..It was then modified by the Yugoslavs to house the K98 action found in it today..I just dont see the Germans putting a K98 into a VZ stock
Vz- K98- both standard length actions, so either way it would be a drop in fit. right? Why wouldn't the Germans fit a K98 into a vz stock. Surely at some point some armorer needed to come up with a complete weapon without a sound stock ready to hand?
Oh sure easily done..its just I've never seen or heard of it being done..lots and lots of german modified weapons..but a German run arsenal putting a K98 into a foreign stock?..I dont know about that one..


Clays right tho..not a VZ24 stock and without the cutouts for the handguard clip not a Vz23 either..The G24(t) during its transformation did have a cupped buttplate and the finger grooves but the picture I saw also had a full length handguard as well..I wonder did the handguard get shortened while the finger groove was still being produced..The German Mauser guys will have to answer that one
 

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..but a German run arsenal putting a K98 into a foreign stock?..I dont know about that one..
I follow you. I thought the original comment was that it couldn't be done. But would they/wouldn't they? I really don't know.

As for Yugo refurb practice, in general it was not like the Russians. Their out look was 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it." They surveyed the weapons for condition. Those beyond practical limits of repair were stripped for usable parts. Barrels they were able to produce. The wide barrel bands seen on 24/47s were cav or vz style secondary sling swivel type with the side loop removed and ground smooth. The narrow bands were original rifle bands.
To continue, as a weapon came onto line for repair, it was checked out and only parts needing replaced were done. Then original markings were removed and the new order's (Tito/communist Yugo) stamps put on and the weapon was refinished. That's it. That's not to say their weren't mix-masters- there are. My guess is theat if they had enough parts around to build whole guns, they did.
 
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