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Platinum Bullet member
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I found these on a Russky site just now & lifted some of the more interesting examples.

1) Straightleg grunts... this does not appear staged. Humping from point A to point B is never any fun.

2) Can't see the bikes well enough. Beemers? Zundapp?

I'm not sure about the coloring... postwar computey-enhanced? SW
 

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Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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Color looks pretty good to me. Probably AGFA film, which was much like Kodachrome (the old, low speed Kodachrome that was both pretty good as far as both color and stability).

Besides the Zundnapps and BMWs, weren't a lot of the military bikes from DKW (Deutsche Karaftfarahd Werke, or similar)?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I did not realize AGFA made color in those days. I know about the SLOW B&W film as another camera nut split a tin of AGFA ASA 10 B&W with me. Talk about sharp!!! Good for nuttin but stills, though.

He was so happy with it, he bought what I had not made up into 24 shot rolls... which was most of my half of the tin. I may still have a roll in the freezer.

I'll have to lift more pics from that set. Some are obviously staged, but others show the invasion of Russia early on. The Germans still had horses.... the surviving nags became rations when the plan went to heck. SW
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
More pics from the color photoset. The rest I saw looked more staged than these. SW
 

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I wouldn't swear AGFA was making color - may have been from a European Eastman-Kodak factory. But I think AGFA made color film (good color film) early on. A lot (most) of the early color was quite slow, and would take both sharp pictures and ones with pretty good stability.

I agree that most of the pictures shown at least remind me of ones from SIGNAL!.

AGFA was not the only company that made slow, very fine-grained and sharp B&W. I had some Ilford B&W with an ASA of 10 or 15, and it was as close to grainless as you can get. Kodak made a similar film.

As far as the Wehrmacht being horse-drawn in Russia, yep, it was. And except for the Panzer and Panzer grenadier divisions, continued to be primarily horse-powered, even in Western Europe, all the way to the end of the war.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
OT... This talk of camera stuff got the wheels turning... I dug out my 4X5 Speed Graphic & just set some film out to thaw. Found my cut film holders & everything! SW
 

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Hmm, wonder if I can find my old Yashica - a Mat-124 twin lens reflex. And if I can get some fresh film. That old 2-1/4x2-1/4 will take good pictures. Maybe go down by the Depot and lay for passing trains - it makes you THINK about setting up your shots and usually leads to better photography.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hmmm... Now to look for a Shutterbug... see what Wollensak lenses are going for these days... in theory, the chemical photography stuff should be getting a little cheeper... SW
 

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I think these were originally in the German wartime magazine Signal.
You are correct. I have many of the 1960's reprints of 'Signal' in book format, and many of those shown on this thread, including the example showing the 37mm PAK, are there in full colour.

I also have some photographs of my late Uncle Micky, taken in Crete in 1941 and later on in Italy - in great colour. He was a signaller in the Wehrmacht from 1938 until he was finally blown up outside Moenchengladbach in 1945, losing a leg and an eye.

He died in 1980.

tac
 
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