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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a bayonet that was advertised as a Brown Bess bayonet. I already have a "Gill" Brown Bess but this one is somewhat smaller and not made as well. I have several references works but I can not find anything that matches. Any help would be appreciated.

Overall Length: 18-5/8"
Blade Length: 14-7/8"
Socket: 3-3/4"
Bore: .80"
Muzzle Length: 1-7/8"
Blade Width: 1"
Blade Front: Flat - no flute
Back Flutes: About 11-1/2" on each side
Markings: No marking that I have been able to find.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Maybe American Version?

I have not seen one with a bore of .80 and blade with so narrow (this one is 1") but could this be an American version of the Brown Bess?
 

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There were many makers of the bayonets for the Brown Bess and no two are ever exactly the same, it looks okay but I am not an "expert". Personally I think it is too well made for an American product of the period of 1775 - 1795 when the US was using the Bess in front line service. At .80 it may be a fusil bayonet for the B.B. officers or light infantry version of .65 cal.?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
mystery solved

I recently joined the SABC. I contacted Shawn Gibson who in turn contacted Graham Priest author of 'The Brown Bess Bayonet 1720-1860'. He sent me the following email.

Thanks for the pictures. This looks like a copy from the British post
1770 Light Dragoon Carbine bayonet with blade "reduced to 15 inches"
after 1796. See my 'The Brown Bess Bayonet 1720-1860' No.79 for the full
length version. Also Skennerton & Richardson 'British & Commonwealth
Bayonets' B73.
The shortening was an official order WO 3/29 p.41.
The bore would have been .65 inch calibre.
Some commercial copies of these were made, and, if yours lacks any view
marks, this will be one of these. By the late 18th Century crowned view
marks were obligatory on Board of Ordnance pieces.
Normally the socket was 4 inches but commercial items had larger
tolerances. Carbines were lightened muskets and were often found to be
more handy in colonial situations as well as on horse back.
I hope this helps?

Regards

Graham
 
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