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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, yea, I know, dumb. So.. is there a way to recover from this?

I had a long narrow handguard that developed a lengthwise crack. The crack was there, but barely visible. So I decided to fix it. Well, long story short, my jig for holding it together was not all that good and the glue, a 2-part epoxy, expanded just enough in the crack to make it visible, more visible than it was before my "repair" .

So, any way to backtrack this? Heat maybe? Should I just learn to live with it and eat my pride? It's there is you look, not that it jumps at you thou.

Yes, I know pictures will be requested, but before I do that... Any ideas?
 

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I have hidden a lot of my 'mistakes' using model airplane paints. I usually get out all my 'brown' colors and see if I can duplicate the colors in the wood while I paint faux woodgrain over the repair.
 

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Does the epoxy tell you what you can do to dissolve it? Sometimes you can use a solvent to get rid of the epoxy and then try again. Just watch that it doesn't strip the finish of the wood. If all else fails, you could take it to someone who specializes in that stuff. That's what I ended up doing in a similar situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
3754759


I think I’m just going to have to live with it. The rifle was refinished with poly or something before I got it, so any more invasive attempt at fixing the botched crack repair will likely screw up the finish even more. Since I don’t know what was used to refinish , I can’t exactly replicate it.

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Acetone soak will loosen a lot of epoxy glues. But it would also strip the finish from the wood.
That wouldn't necessarily be a bad thing if you were thinking of completely redoing the handguard by fixing the crack and then refinishing it.
But unless you have the skills to repair the crack to the point where it's nearly disappears,,I would probably advise to leave the handguard right like it is if the glued joint is solid.

Opening the joint back up and then regluing it generally gets you right back to what you have now. So doing the work is kind of counter productive.

One thing that can be done to hide the glue joint is to color over it.
I would first sand the handguard flat as the repair shows high and low spots. Get them all evened up so the crack doesn't show as a line in the wood.
This will take you back to refinishing the wood once again. But if you want to go there,,after the wood is refinished to match the stock,,then the crack and glue line is carefully colored over with either acrylic paints or some use oil base artists colors.
Then a clear coating is placed on top of the entire piece to protect your art work. The clear coat is sanded down slightly and a finish coat of either a tung oil varnish or a simple linseed oil finish on top.

How's that for some restoration..

Or you could just leave it as is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think I'm going to leave it as is. The rifle is a post-war Indian SMLE and the rosewood stock was lacquered or something before I got it. Yes, not very authentic, but attractive to look at. Knowing my luck, if I start refinishing the handguard to cover my botched repair I would probably end up needing to refinish the whole rifle.


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