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Oh, that was a King snake BTW. Immune from rattler snake venom.

I've had Diamondback many times. More as a kid when I was always running around in the desert.

Caught a huge Diamondback a couple years ago hiding under my trash can lid. I went to lift up the garbage can and my spidey sense alerted me to be careful. Sure nuf he was about a 6 footer and thick. Got him in the garbage can with a hook on the end of a paint stick. Boy was he pissed.
I drove him about a block away and let him go because at that time the pack rats were coming in like Lemmings.

Not sure about snake soup plonker. I'd have to smell it first. Sounds slimy. hehehe

Here's a shot of rattlers having an orgy. Not some place you want to trip into.


good place for a flame thrower!!! :mad
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Not a single snake of any kind in NZ and thats just the way we like it.....
It's just too dang cold there for snakes. Your lucky.
 

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I saw Moccasins on a trip to Georgia to canoe through the Okefenokee (something I recommend everyone do once in their life - it's otherworldly in there). Moccasins not only have potent venom (unlike copperheads which they may be confused with at times) but they're ugly and have attitudes.
Saw the trans-pecos copperhead in Comstock, Texas in the 90's. Lots of them out that summer. Beautiful snake. Our group of collectors took a few back to CA. Those were the days. Southwest would let you take anything on the plane as long as there was plenty of duct tape on it.
never know any one around here that would confuse a copperhead with a Moccasin,


moc's are shorter, fatter and as$holes, I think the term 'Mean as a Snake' is their motto and usually dark colored


generally copperheads avoid people, tend to be skinnier and copper or brown,
 

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What its just a mini dinosaur with a 3rd eye. Not like they're "Big Saltie" sized or venomous.
 

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Excellent snake thread! Great pictures.

I did mineral exploration throughout the deserts of the SW when I was younger. You sure get snake (and scorpion) aware quick.

My best story, and I have a couple, occurred while diamond drilling one night in Nevada. Taking core samples of rock on a claim for assay, somewhere around 1983. Had flood lights set up to work in the dark, and drill water in the desert attracted snakes. I was sitting in my truck and looked over at the drill rig and there comes bursting out of the light, madly dancing, was the drill helper, with a 3 or 4-ft rattler attached to his leg. You want to see somebody dance and scream - he wasn’t bit, the snake was caught in his Carharts, snake lost the battle.
 

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I remember a funny newspaper story a Kiwi woman gave my wife years ago about a joker smuggling a large scrub python into NZ on a cargo boat and letting it go in one of the larger towns, there was no sleep until that dangerous serpent was hunted down and lost its head.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
We got a big lizard here I certain everyone's heard of., one shows up around my house now and then. I'll corner it a poke at it so it hisses and I can see it's blue forked tongue. Gotta be careful because they are fast when they wanna be. Other wise they just mosey along. If it bites you the jaws lock and has to be surgically removed. Meanwhile it's saliva is poisonous and get in your skin.
 

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I saw Moccasins on a trip to Georgia to canoe through the Okefenokee (something I recommend everyone do once in their life - it's otherworldly in there). Moccasins not only have potent venom (unlike copperheads which they may be confused with at times) but they're ugly and have attitudes.
Saw the trans-pecos copperhead in Comstock, Texas in the 90's. Lots of them out that summer. Beautiful snake. Our group of collectors took a few back to CA. Those were the days. Southwest would let you take anything on the plane as long as there was plenty of duct tape on it.
Bro Petrov, if you ever go the the Okefenokee, let me know. I live on the eastern side in Nassau County, FL. My wife and I go there frequently. Snakes in the water are not common there as one might think due to the tremendous amounts of alligators. On the land there are plenty of large eastern diamond backs and cane brake rattlers (timber rattlers). The dusky pygmy rattle is there as well. One has to be very vigilant in the pine and palmetto forests. Moccasins are certainly in the shallow environs, but are not very obvious. The snakes on land are wont to go down gopher tortoise hole. That is always where collectors or viewers try to locate.

My wife is a serious wildlife photographer and once she put the camera to her eye, I am the eyes and ears. Sometimes she will frighten me to almost death's door step chasing a bird in a palmetto thicket. I almost have to be in hands' reach all of the time. Even on logging roads, she will be looking up in the trees and not on the ground. Not cool.
 

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I remember a funny newspaper story a Kiwi woman gave my wife years ago about a joker smuggling a large scrub python into NZ on a cargo boat and letting it go in one of the larger towns, there was no sleep until that dangerous serpent was hunted down and lost its head.
What snakes do find their way here,usually arrive in a vehicle imported 2nd hand......although one did fall out of a aircrafts wheelwell a couple years back upon landing fron Australia....but usually its in a car of truck someone ships here and a snake comes along for the ride.As soon as they are discovered they are euthanised.....no exceptions.
 

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Bro Petrov, if you ever go the the Okefenokee, let me know. I live on the eastern side in Nassau County, FL. My wife and I go there frequently. Snakes in the water are not common there as one might think due to the tremendous amounts of alligators. On the land there are plenty of large eastern diamond backs and cane brake rattlers (timber rattlers). The dusky pygmy rattle is there as well. One has to be very vigilant in the pine and palmetto forests. Moccasins are certainly in the shallow environs, but are not very obvious. The snakes on land are wont to go down gopher tortoise hole. That is always where collectors or viewers try to locate.

My wife is a serious wildlife photographer and once she put the camera to her eye, I am the eyes and ears. Sometimes she will frighten me to almost death's door step chasing a bird in a palmetto thicket. I almost have to be in hands' reach all of the time. Even on logging roads, she will be looking up in the trees and not on the ground. Not cool.
In the swamp we had alligators paralleling the canoes and at one point bellowing at us. Yes, the snakes weren't common in the water. But there was so much other stuff. Even some of the plants were carnivorous. The clouds of mosquitoes that rose up around dusk would break up our dinners and have us running for our tents (those smart enough to have brought tents). The first night, when they all rose up, we heard the sound and thought a plane was lading somewhere close by.
 

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A buddy of mine was tubing on the Antietam Creek here in Md with some friends. Out of the blue they were surrounded by several cottonmouths who's territory they'd floated into. He said it was the first time he ever looked UP into a cottonmouth's mouth close up!
 

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If you are thinking of eating snakes/ using as a food source, plan on adding rodents to your menu or they will eat or foul your stash while you have a snack snake.
 

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If you are thinking of eating snakes/ using as a food source, plan on adding rodents to your menu or they will eat or foul your stash while you have a snack snake.
Why would you store feeder snakes dead? Just put them in a cool place. They should keep for weeks or months if they were well fed at capture.
A rattlesnake will likely take more that 6 months to starve. Yes, it will consume some of it's fat and protein in the process but not all of it. Seafarers visiting the Galapagos in the 1800's took on those huge tortoises as food and they also lived for months.
 
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