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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got this #1 mk III several years ago. It is matching and appears to be in unissued condition, possibly refurb. There are very few markings on it and I was hoping someone could give me help with info like where it was made or any other details. I am having trouble with the date as well, can't tell if it's 1943 or 45.
3753632
3753634
3753649
3753651
3753653
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I had it out earlier today to sight it in as I thought I might like to take it out deer hunting this year. It was very accurate shooting off a rest, but I wasn't very accurate with it free hand so due to a lack of time and ammo I decided to stick with my sported M10 Ross with Williams diopter which I can shoot accurately free hand for this year until I get some time and make some more ammo this winter to get myself trained with it for next year.
 

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There has been talk of '45s existing, but no definitive examples have arisen IIRC. The prefixes keep indicating 1943 production.

We are fortunate in the Enfield world to have 3 & 5 stamps that are so similar as to be confusing.
 

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Up until 1940, BSA made normal high-quality No1 MkIII* on limited military contracts, marked with the usual Crown and BSA&Co, as well as identical rifles just marked "BSA&Co" for commercial sale and export.
With the invasion scare, the Ministry of Supply ordered BSA to make rifles out of whatever parts it could get together. Hence the rifles were made of mixtures of commercial and military parts, mixed walnut and beech wood (or all-beech), later on No4 butts and firing pin/cocking pieces. A second wave of production in 1945 even used recycled and re-dated receivers.
About the same time the emergency rifle production was started, BSA was ordered to disperse its many Birmingham factories away from the bomb-target central area, and also to increase war production by diluting experienced staff with war staff. BSA was a huge engineering group, and this "Dispersal" programme led to 70 seperate factories being set up, moved and/or expanded. Rifle production involved several of these factories (both No1s and No4s), and this type of "all available parts" No1 has become known as a "Dispersal rifle". Technically, even the No4s were Dispersals, as well as motorbikes, bicycles, aircraft parts, machine guns and heavy weaponry...
BSA marked these rifles with just the first "B" of BSA&Co. Presumably this was to dissociate the company from these slightly less-than top quality peacetime rifles!
 

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Until we have a prefix I am going with a 5
Tend to agree.
It looks quite different to the "3" in the 1943 Marking, and VERY similar to the "5" in other 1945 rifles
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks guys that date sure was hard to read even in hand with a magnifying glass and a flashlight depending how the light hit it I would swear it was a 3 then I would swear it was a 5 it was like one of those optical illusions like the rabbit head or duck head one.
 
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