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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A recent article by Mike Venturino got me to thinking (often a dangerous thing). He mentioned that if your sights are zeroed fine but the front sight is located too far right (or left) on the barrel and therefore
looks kinda goofy, it's possible to put it back to a center position over the barrel by moving the rear sight. Won't make the rifle shoot any better but it will LOOK better. Well, your sight picture will look better probably.

My LSA 1916 SMLE's front sight is waaaay left and it does look strange. Is it a doable job for a decent hammer mechanic or is it better to just leave it as it shoots right to point of aim. I don't mind going through the sighting in process again as really, it's fun to shoot the old girl. Any advice on the job?

Thanks in advance.
 

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or is it better to just leave it as it shoots right to point of aim.
If by "right" you mean "correctly", and your shots are actually hitting to your point of aim, leave it alone! (If it ain't broke, don't fix it...)

If by "right" you mean the opposite of left, then your front sight can be moved happily to the right to bring your shots closer to zero. This might help with the look of the rifle.

If your 1916 SMLE has a fixed windage rear sight, there is no useful/non-damaging correction you can do to it, a bigger hammer will NOT help!

If you're lucky enough to have a windage adjustable rear sight, then it is simple enough to move your foresight blade to the right towards a more central position, and displace your rear sight the correct number of clicks to move the notch the same amount. (Which way you need to move the rear sight needs careful thinking about - I'm thinking it needs to go right as well.)
 

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My advice is to leave it alone.

The sights are pinned to the barrel and whilst it would be possible to punch out the pin, realign and then solder the back sight in it's new position, in all honesty I wouldn't think it would be worth the effort in addition to what it could do to the collectability of the rifle by making a non standard modification.
 

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An alternative would be to replace the sights with "no-gunsmithing" type replacements. One which is often used are the MoJo's here:

http://www.mojosights.com/


If it were mine, I would store the originals, (Greased and wrapped to prevent rust) packed inside the butt trap so the original parts are always with the rifle.
 

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If your 1916 SMLE has a fixed windage rear sight, there is no useful/non-damaging correction you can do to it, a bigger hammer will NOT help!
^ This.

Nearly all 'Enfields' you find will have the front sight offset a bit to the left. That is simply what needs to be to make the POI match the POA.

I have heard two theories about this.

One has to do with the bullet drift at long range going to the left from the left-hand rifling. Scientifically provable, but unlikely on the Enfield sights, which are pretty simply constructed .

To look at a rear sight that WAS corrected for bullet drift at long range, you need look no further than the slanted elevation adjustment on the rear sight on a 1903 Springfield (with the Springfield, the right hand rifling drifts the bullet off to the right).

The other has to do with the actions being rear-locking and the left receiver rails are much heavier and stiffer than the right receiver rails on all models. The story goes that the right rail 'stretches' more than the left rail upon firing, cocking the barrel slightly to the left as the bullet leaves.

I just put these out there as theories. There may or may not be truth in either of them, but I DO find both of them interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Gentlemen,

Thanks for the responses. learned quite a bit. My language usage prolly wasn't the best - when I said it shoots right to POA, I meant that it shoots exactly to POA. As I have yet to sell any firearm I have acquired, the collectability factor is
not there on the old girl. My wife can worry about the value of my collection assuming I slip my anchor cable before she does <grin>.

I was wondering HOW to move the rear sight and how hard a job would it be. Really would like to know how to move the rear sight. Can't be that difficult? Some Marvel Mystery Oil/Liquid Wrench and let it soak for a day or two and then....?

How's it done?
 

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I was wondering HOW to move the rear sight and how hard a job would it be. Really would like to know how to move the rear sight. Can't be that difficult? Some Marvel Mystery Oil/Liquid Wrench and let it soak for a day or two and then....?

How's it done?
You don't. There is no means to adjust the rear sight in windage on an SMLE of that vintage. Any attempt to realign it comes under the heading of "damage" for me.
 

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As I have yet to sell any firearm I have acquired, the collectability factor is not there on the old girl.

I was wondering HOW to move the rear sight and how hard a job would it be...........How's it done?
You have a 1916 LSA which isn't exactly a common rifle. It is indeed collectible. Most all collect knowing that our rifles aren't really ours. We paid to enjoy the privledge of holding on to them until it's time to pass them along to the next generation of collectors.

You have been told there is no way to do this without making a permanent alteration to the rifle, thus screwing the next owners out of a desireable specimen. You have also been shown a non damaging option which.....you apparently have chosen to ignore??

There is one way to ever-so-slighty shift the rear sight but the tool to do it is as scarce as hen's teeth and the cost would be whatever the market will tolerate. In other words, expensive. Mind you, this tool was only used to adjust target rifles back in the day.

So long as it's hitting where you want then don't try to fix what's there. You'll only break something, go in search of a non-matched part, and then discover that part has only made your "problem" a real problem. I know this isn't what you want to hear, but the whole board so far is in agreement on the subject.

If you want to hear something you like, I'm sure somebody could direct you to a certain other board where their so-called experts will gladly make up some BS for you. Makes them feel all-knowing and you'll get the words you're looking for.
 
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