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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can across a 1942 dated Husky M38, non-threaded muzzle, visible parts serial number match with mix electro pencil and stamp. Handguard color and fitting lead me to believe its a replacement. Price tag = 575.00 dollars!!!! Good old days are gone, I guess.
 

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They've been up there lately. I've wondered what or who spurred the dramatic price increases myself.
 

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I can only assume that the great reputation and increasing rarity (I hardly see them anymore at shows or in shops) has triggered a reaction among collectors that these should be acquired when they are available.

I recently traded for a 96/38 to add to the few Swedes I have. I'm glad to have it, though the M39 I traded was nice. However, there are many M39's still at dealers...
 

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Yes, the Swedish Mausers are perhaps not "military surplus" anymore. They seem to be transforming into the "Collectors Arms" category at a very fast rate. Something like the Krag and Martini have done.
 

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Many of them were military surplus that became civilian surplus. Most of the Mausers we are getting from Sweden haven't been sitting stored at the arsenal for years. They have been in civilian hands for quite some time and it's getting harder to find one in 100% original military configuration. That price is still a bit high for an original military M38, or the even less common M96/38. The ones for sale on my website cost less.
Allan Schisel
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I remembered when Swedish M96 went for 99.99 at Sports Town. On sales for 69.99. Nearly every gun shop or pawn shop have an obligatory Swede. Those were the good days.
 

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If you haven’t noticed all the prices on the Military surplus guns have been sneaking up little by little. A few $$ here a $$$ dollars there. Watch the online prices vs the gun show prices, the average m96 prices was between $200/$300 for decades. The m38/96 and m38 were higher, $350/$375. Before the 6.5 ammo was available the rifles were $20. I predict in a short time we will see a $1,000 a standard bolt action military surplus rifle and snipers will be triple that.

The Russian Mosin s will be the cheapest. The Swiss, the Finnish, the Swedes will be higher.
 

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If you haven’t noticed all the prices on the Military surplus guns have been sneaking up little by little. A few $$ here a $$$ dollars there. Watch the online prices vs the gun show prices, the average m96 prices was between $200/$300 for decades. The m38/96 and m38 were higher, $350/$375. Before the 6.5 ammo was available the rifles were $20.
MR 1911crazy, please watch out for these old post...this one is 13 yrs old/dormant. Most of them aren’t really relevant or have participants that aren’t on GB any longer.

The dump new GB user interface of course pops these up in your feed based on what you’ve viewed/commented on.
 

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We are still in the good old days. 5 or 10 years from now, Mosin Nagants will cost $1,000. Well, maybe $100, but that's still a 33% increase!
Allan Schisel
Surplus Military gun collecting was something anyone could do with little investment. Plus we had gun shows to enjoy. Even on a tight budget saving my lunch money, example I could afford a captured German Yugo model 98 8 mm for $79 and a Finnish vkt m39 Mosin for $89. That was in the late 80’s.
Seems collecting these old war horses that most have seen battles that we can own, touch and shoot these pieces of history that are locked in time is awesome. If they could only talk.
 
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