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I know there was allot of WW2 stuff used by the North. Did they use SKS's awsell?
I really doubt that the SKS was issued to any Commie troops in Korea. Most N Korean and Chinese Weapons were WW2 era items available in HUGE numbers from existing stockpiles.

I can not see the Soviets giving away new stuff right off the production line when the storerooms are FULL of WW2 surplus.

Chinese did not get or at least produce the SKS until way after the Korean war....how were the N Koreans going to get them sooner?
 

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The Russians had just began fielding the SKS one year before the start of the Korean War. A cessation of hostilities stop the fighting in 1953 (remember, the war never really ended) and the Russians were still fielding SKS rifles to its military. As they hold-tight their weapons for several years before the export them, and the Chinese didn't produce their version until 1956, there weren't any SKS rifles given to the Korean Peoples Army.

With that said, it certainly doesn't mean there weren't Russian advisors in North Korea during that time that didn't have an SKS with them. But none were ever noted having an SKS rifle nor was a Russian SKS rifle ever observed/captured.
 

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Hot Topic

Check the archives of this forum for previous material on this topic.

See - "awsell" - Nigel Thomas & Peter Abbott, THE KOREAN WAR (Osprey Books, London, 1986), Plate A opposite P. 24, and Pp. 37 & 38.

The late, great David Hackwith claims several times in his autobiography encountering and capturing SKS-45s during said conflict. Sorry, don't own a copy to check at this time.

So ... yes ... these carbines were used in Korea against UN-troops in combat evidently.
 

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SKS's were used in the Korean War, though most probably came into the theater being carried by Chinese troops. I have visited the War Museum of Korea located in Seoul, and there are a quite a few SKS-45s on display, captured during the war. Of course, there were also quite a few Japanese rifles, Mosin, PPSh, and all sorts of other military rifles captured from NK or Chinese troops. There were quite a few M1 Garand and M1 Carbines on display, along with some 1903 Springfields, Thompsons, some Enfields and various other rifles used mainly by the South.
 

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The Russians had just began fielding the SKS one year before the start of the Korean War. A cessation of hostilities stop the fighting in 1953 (remember, the war never really ended) and the Russians were still fielding SKS rifles to its military. As they hold-tight their weapons for several years before the export them, and the Chinese didn't produce their version until 1956, there weren't any SKS rifles given to the Korean Peoples Army.

With that said, it certainly doesn't mean there weren't Russian advisors in North Korea during that time that didn't have an SKS with them. But none were ever noted having an SKS rifle nor was a Russian SKS rifle ever observed/captured.
Actually, there were SKS rifles used by the communist forces. David Hackworth, for example, mentioned them in his memoirs. I suspect that they were used in the late part of the war, and in relatively small numbers.
 

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Good lord - you're absolutely right! I don't know where I was when I wrote that. Goes to show I cannot write into three different forum posts at the same time. And it's a subject I'm quite passionate about. :eek:

I've also been to the musueum in Seoul (which I would highly recommend) several times and do remember the displays. Wish I would've taken more photos and had a better camera at the time (1999).
 

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Out of the Bag

The SKS cat was out of the bag in 1945, when the nazis captured a few samples, test fired them and published a technical report on the carbine prior to the collapse of their criminal regime.

The Russians undoubtedly knew this having captured copies of the report themselves.

There is evidence that the Ivans were wary of tipping their hat on the AK, first used to supress the Hungarian national revolt of 1956, and that they took steps to keep their new avtomat a state secret. But the SKS was another story.

And for those who were wondering there were thousands of Russian military advisors attached to Chinese PLA formations and units operating in Korea, 1952-53. Some of these paid w/ their lives in fulfilling their "international combat duty."
 

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I keep hearing about SKS and SVT40 use in Korea, but have seen no hard evidence of their use by NK or Chinese troops. I have seen probably a couple of hundred photos of Chinese/NK troops with weapons during the war, and pictures taken by allied soldiers of captured weapons.

Shown are:

Maxim MGs (Russian version too)
SGMs
DP MG
Brens (and the 7.92 versions particularly)
Thompson SMG
PPS43
PPSH41
STENs
Mausers (many versions)
M91/30 MN rifle
M91/30 MN Sniper Rifles with PU scopes
M44 MN rifles
P14/Model 1917 rifles
M1903 Springfields
M88 Commision rifles
M1 Garands (by Chinese - probably recent captures)
Jap Type 38/99 rifles
Tokarev pistol
Browning HP pistols
Colt M1911

Can basically assume any weapon used in WWII saw action there - although I have seen no evidence of MG34, MG42, or MP44.

Having an SKS in a museum in South Korea is not positive proof - could have been from a defecting NK soldier after war. Although memoirs are proof - I have seen more than a few that were clearly full of errors.

Reasons I would argue against their use.

Korea was considered a side show by the US and Russia, Europe was their primary concern. For instance - the US only sent first line jets there after the MIGs showed up. MIGs showed up because the US had complete controll of the air previously, and this was an utter nightmare for the communist forces. I would bet the Russians were working full time supplying their forces for a conflict in Europe. Russia never had a record of supplying its allies with it's first line weapons till its forces were fully equipped.

Ammo supply for Chinese/NK troops was already a nightmare. Chinese troops are particularly reported as putting emphasis on weapons that could use captured ammo. Cant imagine introducing a new round into the mix.


Any how - I would bet that Russians serving as advisors carried them, but they were not shooting at us.

Show me a period picture of one, and I will change my mind.
 

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Also I would state that the NK troops were much better armed than the Chinese. NK troops were mostly armed with WWII Russian arms, while the Chinese had to put up with anything they could scrounge up (see list above).

As for museums credibility - know of a first class firearm museum in Alabama with an SVT38 clearly listed as an SVT40. No student of Russian firearms could make such an obvious mistake.
 

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I tend to believe Hackworth about use of SKS in Korean War. I also know of one collector who said that he had an SKS that was captured in Korea. He was a member of the Pennsylvania Gun Collectors Assn, but last time I talked to him he was fighting cancer. I tried calling him later, but no answer, so I suspect that it was fatal.
 

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Hello all. I've heard several "Rumors" of SKS being used in Korea. I've read "The Last Parallel, A Marine's War Journal" by Martin Russ (A GREAT BOOK!). In the book he discusses a Chinese sniper that fires two or three rapids shots. He said that he "thought that it was an SKS or possibly a captured Garand." I've also seen books like the Osprey series that have shown SKS being used there. Who knows?
 

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Any how - I would bet that Russians serving as advisors carried them, but they were not shooting at us.
So the Russian MIG pilots who flew MIGS against the US Air Force pilots during Korea didn't (1) shoot at us or (2) some of them didn't get shot down either. This brings to mind another question; those Soviet Advisors in Viet Nam? Were they non-violent non-participatory as well?
 

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Never said that Russians were not actively trying to kill Americans. MIGs, as I discussed earlier above, were the most prominent example. They also were manning the radars, and providing various training that led directly to dead GIs.

There is, however, no evidence that any Russian ever fired a rifle, MG, or SMG at a US soldier. MIG pilots did not carry SKS carbines in their planes either.

Going back to your MIG example; if you read up on the air war the Russians went to great lengths to keep their pilots out of UN hands. More than one report of Russian pilots being ordered to strafe their own downed pilots to prevent their capture. Also note that MIGs were restricted to flying over friendly ground.

Would'nt a similar concern lead to the Russians leaving their army advisors in the rear areas???
 

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Tom-M:

You said it first, that the Russians ordered at least one of their jets to kill a downed pilot who would have been picked up by US or UN forces.

This is 'off the topic', but a guy in my Dad's company (long before he retired) described having flown A-4s over Vietnam. A US pilot who had ejected was in the water with a boat of approaching VC (or North-), who were shooting at him from whichever distance.

A few A-4s used their cannons to blow the small boat and its crew to pieces, just in time to save the guy.
Wish I knew who could sell me some "Hanoi Jane" stickers for my f***** bag. These would be a real hit in MSP and Madison, WI;).
 

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Laufer - will look at the next Gunshow for Hanoi Jane bumber stickers for you. Know I will never forgive her. Really would like to piss on her grave!
 

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A Korean War vet once told me the north had SKSs, but as stated above it's very common for combat vets to get stuff like that wrong. It's not that there's anything less than legit about their experience or memories or whatever. It's just that they were not and usually never became very well versed in identifying a broad range of weapons. They knew a quite a bit of practical things about the weapons they used and a little about the ones they faced.
 

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A Korean War vet once told me the north had SKSs, but as stated above it's very common for combat vets to get stuff like that wrong. It's not that there's anything less than legit about their experience or memories or whatever. It's just that they were not and usually never became very well versed in identifying a broad range of weapons. They knew a quite a bit of practical things about the weapons they used and a little about the ones they faced.
As a "ferinstance" Michael Lee Lanning mentions in one of his books about VN captured scoped SKS rifles. I have never seen or heard of a documented bringback one, and years ago I got to see a lot of what was in the extensive National Training Center (NTC) collection of Comblok weapons and they didn't have one there, tho they had some fantastic captured early SVD's. Both a KW bringback SKS and a VN bringback sniper SKS are "plausible" but would need some more conclusive proof. Maybe writing one of the docents at the museum in Seoul would shed some light on the subject.
 
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